2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163613
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neonatal nurses and bereavement/end of life: Perceptions, roles, and involvement
Author(s):
Engler, Art; Cusson, Regina M.
Author Details:
Art Engler, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: arthur.engler@uconn.edu; Regina M. Cusson
Abstract:
Purpose: Approximately 19,000 newborns died in the United States in 1998 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2000). There are few data available to help nurses meet the needs of parents of critically ill and/or dying infants. The purpose of this study was to describe neonatal staff and advanced practice nurses' perceptions of their roles with families of these infants. Research Questions: 1. How comfortable are nurses with bereavement/end of life (B/EOL) care? 2. What are nurses' perceptions of their role with families of critically ill/dying infants? 3. What influences nurses' involvement with families of critically ill/dying infants? Methods: This study used a survey mailed to a stratified random sample of 240 U.S. neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The final response rate was 52%. The Bereavement End-of-Life Attitudes about Care: Neonatal Nurses Scale (BEACONNS), an 80-item questionnaire based on a review of the literature, contained four sections: Comfort, Roles, and Involvement, in addition to a demographic section. The researchers used SPSS 10.0 to conduct both descriptive and inferential analyses. Results and Conclusions: Respondents were very comfortable with many aspects of B/EOL care. Comfort with B/EOL care correlated significantly with both number of years as a nurse and number of years as a NICU nurse. Fewer than half the respondents were comfortable discussing autopsy or organ donation with families of dying infants. Respondents agreed about many important aspects of their roles with families. Most identified caring for a dying infant, the actual death of an infant, and language or cultural differences as influential factors in the level of their involvement with families. Additional findings indicated that, as would be expected, frequency of caring for critically ill or dying infants was directly related to NICU Level (I, II, or III). Nurses from Level III NICUs were significantly more comfortable with caring for critically ill or dying infants than nurses from either Level I or Level II NICUS. Finally, nurses from NICUs with B/EOL policies in place were significantly more comfortable than those from NICUs without such policies. There were no significant differences in perceptions of roles and involvement with families based on any study variable. This study has contributed to the B/EOL literature in a variety of ways. NICU nurses are very comfortable with most aspects of their role. Efforts should be made to sustain this comfort and to increase comfort in those less comfortable, by providing appropriate continuing education and training. Nurses from Level I and Level II NICUs might need additional support in enhancing their skills in this area of care, as they deal with the situation less often than those from Level III NICUs. Provision of culturally sensitive care also presents an area of discomfort, indicating that additional education and training in this area could also be useful. Finally, nurses should be encouraged to develop culturally appropriate B/EOL polices for their units, as this has been shown to improve comfort level. Nurses' perceptions of their roles and involvement with families showed fewer identifiable patterns, thus limiting conclusions about these variables. Implications for Nursing Practice: Although education and training can affect comfort with B/EOL issues, perceptions of roles and involvement with families are less likely to be affected, as these seem to be inherent parts of the nursing role. The curricular guidelines for end-of-life nursing care published by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing could be instrumental in improving care of this group of families.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeonatal nurses and bereavement/end of life: Perceptions, roles, and involvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEngler, Arten_US
dc.contributor.authorCusson, Regina M.en_US
dc.author.detailsArt Engler, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: arthur.engler@uconn.edu; Regina M. Cussonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163613-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Approximately 19,000 newborns died in the United States in 1998 (National Center for Health Statistics, 2000). There are few data available to help nurses meet the needs of parents of critically ill and/or dying infants. The purpose of this study was to describe neonatal staff and advanced practice nurses' perceptions of their roles with families of these infants. Research Questions: 1. How comfortable are nurses with bereavement/end of life (B/EOL) care? 2. What are nurses' perceptions of their role with families of critically ill/dying infants? 3. What influences nurses' involvement with families of critically ill/dying infants? Methods: This study used a survey mailed to a stratified random sample of 240 U.S. neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The final response rate was 52%. The Bereavement End-of-Life Attitudes about Care: Neonatal Nurses Scale (BEACONNS), an 80-item questionnaire based on a review of the literature, contained four sections: Comfort, Roles, and Involvement, in addition to a demographic section. The researchers used SPSS 10.0 to conduct both descriptive and inferential analyses. Results and Conclusions: Respondents were very comfortable with many aspects of B/EOL care. Comfort with B/EOL care correlated significantly with both number of years as a nurse and number of years as a NICU nurse. Fewer than half the respondents were comfortable discussing autopsy or organ donation with families of dying infants. Respondents agreed about many important aspects of their roles with families. Most identified caring for a dying infant, the actual death of an infant, and language or cultural differences as influential factors in the level of their involvement with families. Additional findings indicated that, as would be expected, frequency of caring for critically ill or dying infants was directly related to NICU Level (I, II, or III). Nurses from Level III NICUs were significantly more comfortable with caring for critically ill or dying infants than nurses from either Level I or Level II NICUS. Finally, nurses from NICUs with B/EOL policies in place were significantly more comfortable than those from NICUs without such policies. There were no significant differences in perceptions of roles and involvement with families based on any study variable. This study has contributed to the B/EOL literature in a variety of ways. NICU nurses are very comfortable with most aspects of their role. Efforts should be made to sustain this comfort and to increase comfort in those less comfortable, by providing appropriate continuing education and training. Nurses from Level I and Level II NICUs might need additional support in enhancing their skills in this area of care, as they deal with the situation less often than those from Level III NICUs. Provision of culturally sensitive care also presents an area of discomfort, indicating that additional education and training in this area could also be useful. Finally, nurses should be encouraged to develop culturally appropriate B/EOL polices for their units, as this has been shown to improve comfort level. Nurses' perceptions of their roles and involvement with families showed fewer identifiable patterns, thus limiting conclusions about these variables. Implications for Nursing Practice: Although education and training can affect comfort with B/EOL issues, perceptions of roles and involvement with families are less likely to be affected, as these seem to be inherent parts of the nursing role. The curricular guidelines for end-of-life nursing care published by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing could be instrumental in improving care of this group of families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:39Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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