Kangaroo care, wallaby care, and maternal stress in the NICU physiological and psychological effects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163614
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Kangaroo care, wallaby care, and maternal stress in the NICU physiological and psychological effects
Author(s):
Engler, Art
Author Details:
Art Engler, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: arthur.engler@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the effect of holding a hospitalized newborn in Kangaroo Care (i.e., skin-to-skin, chest-to-chest) on maternal stress levels as evidenced by physiological and psychological markers. Specific Aim: To measure the effect of kangaroo care (KC) on physiological and psychological indicators of maternal stress using a randomized controlled trial design. Framework: The conceptual model that guided this study was the Model of Maternal Stress. Hospitalization of the infant in the intensive care unit is the stressor and particular environmental stimuli, such as the sites and sounds of the NICU, and parental role alteration required by the hospitalization, influence the level of maternal stress. Categories of stimuli are known as dimensions, three of which are considered as essential contributors to maternal stress: Infant's Appearance and Behavior, Parental Role Alterations, and Sights and Sounds of the NICU. These three dimensions constitute the revised Parental Stressor Scale: NICU (PSS: NICU). KC was postulated to decrease maternal stress because of its impact on elements constituting each of the contributors to stress that the PSS:NICU scale measures. Methods: The study uses a pretest-posttest randomized control trial design. Independent and random assignment to groups using computerized minimization technique, following informed, signed consent. The KC mothers provide KC for their infant for 2 hours. Wallaby Care (WC) mothers provide WC for their infant for 2 hours; that is, they sit next to their infant's bed and may talk to or touch the infant, but not hold them during the study period. [Control mothers may provide KC for their infants following the study period at the discretion of NICU staff.]. Measures are obtained as follows: Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist (MAACL) before the study period; the Parental Stress Scale: NICU and salivary cortisol samples, before, during, and after the study period; and galvanic skin resistance and skin conductance levels continuously from before to 10 min. after the study period. Results and Conclusions: To date, 10 subjects have been enrolled (KC group = 4, WC group = 6). There have been no significant differences between groups on any demographic variables. Five t tests were conducted to examine the differences in change scores on dependent variables. There was a significant difference only in Parental Stress Scale scores from Pre- to Post-Study, t (6.1) = 3.98, p = .009, with subjects in the KC group decreasing more than subjects in the WC group (M = 25.93%, SD = 11.01 vs. M = 7.8%, SD = 2.78), using the Bonferroni correction for multiple analyses. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The literature review of KC and stress revealed gaps. First, reports of stress in mothers of preterm infants have been limited to subjective measures to evaluate maternal satisfaction with KC. No reports of objective measures of maternal stress could be found, even in the postpartum literature. Therefore, this study will make the contribution of using triangulation to evaluate both subjective and objective measures of maternal stress. The stress literature, on the other hand, is abundant. Researchers define stress as the process in which environmental demands tax or exceed the adaptive capacity of an organism, resulting in psychological and biological changes that may place persons at risk for disease. Demonstrating that the beneficial effects of KC extend beyond the infant to the mother could be a significant step in designing interventions to assist this group of mothers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKangaroo care, wallaby care, and maternal stress in the NICU physiological and psychological effectsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEngler, Arten_US
dc.author.detailsArt Engler, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: arthur.engler@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163614-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the effect of holding a hospitalized newborn in Kangaroo Care (i.e., skin-to-skin, chest-to-chest) on maternal stress levels as evidenced by physiological and psychological markers. Specific Aim: To measure the effect of kangaroo care (KC) on physiological and psychological indicators of maternal stress using a randomized controlled trial design. Framework: The conceptual model that guided this study was the Model of Maternal Stress. Hospitalization of the infant in the intensive care unit is the stressor and particular environmental stimuli, such as the sites and sounds of the NICU, and parental role alteration required by the hospitalization, influence the level of maternal stress. Categories of stimuli are known as dimensions, three of which are considered as essential contributors to maternal stress: Infant's Appearance and Behavior, Parental Role Alterations, and Sights and Sounds of the NICU. These three dimensions constitute the revised Parental Stressor Scale: NICU (PSS: NICU). KC was postulated to decrease maternal stress because of its impact on elements constituting each of the contributors to stress that the PSS:NICU scale measures. Methods: The study uses a pretest-posttest randomized control trial design. Independent and random assignment to groups using computerized minimization technique, following informed, signed consent. The KC mothers provide KC for their infant for 2 hours. Wallaby Care (WC) mothers provide WC for their infant for 2 hours; that is, they sit next to their infant's bed and may talk to or touch the infant, but not hold them during the study period. [Control mothers may provide KC for their infants following the study period at the discretion of NICU staff.]. Measures are obtained as follows: Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist (MAACL) before the study period; the Parental Stress Scale: NICU and salivary cortisol samples, before, during, and after the study period; and galvanic skin resistance and skin conductance levels continuously from before to 10 min. after the study period. Results and Conclusions: To date, 10 subjects have been enrolled (KC group = 4, WC group = 6). There have been no significant differences between groups on any demographic variables. Five t tests were conducted to examine the differences in change scores on dependent variables. There was a significant difference only in Parental Stress Scale scores from Pre- to Post-Study, t (6.1) = 3.98, p = .009, with subjects in the KC group decreasing more than subjects in the WC group (M = 25.93%, SD = 11.01 vs. M = 7.8%, SD = 2.78), using the Bonferroni correction for multiple analyses. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: The literature review of KC and stress revealed gaps. First, reports of stress in mothers of preterm infants have been limited to subjective measures to evaluate maternal satisfaction with KC. No reports of objective measures of maternal stress could be found, even in the postpartum literature. Therefore, this study will make the contribution of using triangulation to evaluate both subjective and objective measures of maternal stress. The stress literature, on the other hand, is abundant. Researchers define stress as the process in which environmental demands tax or exceed the adaptive capacity of an organism, resulting in psychological and biological changes that may place persons at risk for disease. Demonstrating that the beneficial effects of KC extend beyond the infant to the mother could be a significant step in designing interventions to assist this group of mothers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:40Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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