The relationship between depression, perceived stigma, and self-efficacy in persons living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163615
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship between depression, perceived stigma, and self-efficacy in persons living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy
Author(s):
Erlen, Judith; Mellors, Mary Pat; Thato, Sathja
Author Details:
Judith Erlen, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jae001@pitt.edu; Mary Pat Mellors; Sathja Thato
Abstract:
Given the complexity of human behavior, multiple determinants including patient characteristics may affect medication adherence. There is strong evidence to support the role of self-efficacy (confidence in one's ability to follow treatment regimen) as a significant predictor of adherence; however, less certainty exists in regard to what factors affect self-efficacy. Using social cognitive theory, the purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between depression, perceived stigma, and self-efficacy in persons living with HIV (PLWHIV). Seventy-three PLWHIV (47 males, 26 females) living in western Pennsylvania were recruited into this study. Forty-six (63%) of the subjects were white and 27 (37%) were African-American. The mean age was 40.4 years. Primary exposure categories included: gay-bisexual (42%), injection drug use (21%), and heterosexual (32%). Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory and perceived stigma was measured using the Perceived Stigma Scale. Self-efficacy (perceived self efficacy regarding the ability to carry out the regimen and perceived efficacy outcomes) was measured using an investigator-developed instrument. The associations among these variables were analyzed using Pearson R. The findings demonstrated significant negative associations between depression and perceived self-efficacy (r=-.586, p=.000) and between depression and perceived efficacy outcomes (r=-.326, p=.005). Likewise, a significant negative relationship was found between perceived stigma and perceived self-efficacy (r=-.441, p=.000), and between perceived self-efficacy and the perceived stigma subscales of disclosure (r=-.271, p=020), negative self-image (r=-.513, p=000), and perceptions of public attitude (r=-.280, p=.016). Depression and perceived stigma are important factors that may affect self efficacy, and thus may affect a PLWHIV's ability to adhere. Since the incidence of depression among PLWHIV is high, depression should be addressed before initiating therapy. Assisting patients to identify support systems may help offset their view of the negative societal acceptability of their illness. Understanding these relationships will enable health care providers to provide evidence-based care to this population and give patients the best opportunity for an optimal response to HIV therapies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship between depression, perceived stigma, and self-efficacy in persons living with HIV on antiretroviral therapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorErlen, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMellors, Mary Paten_US
dc.contributor.authorThato, Sathjaen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Erlen, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jae001@pitt.edu; Mary Pat Mellors; Sathja Thatoen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163615-
dc.description.abstractGiven the complexity of human behavior, multiple determinants including patient characteristics may affect medication adherence. There is strong evidence to support the role of self-efficacy (confidence in one's ability to follow treatment regimen) as a significant predictor of adherence; however, less certainty exists in regard to what factors affect self-efficacy. Using social cognitive theory, the purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between depression, perceived stigma, and self-efficacy in persons living with HIV (PLWHIV). Seventy-three PLWHIV (47 males, 26 females) living in western Pennsylvania were recruited into this study. Forty-six (63%) of the subjects were white and 27 (37%) were African-American. The mean age was 40.4 years. Primary exposure categories included: gay-bisexual (42%), injection drug use (21%), and heterosexual (32%). Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory and perceived stigma was measured using the Perceived Stigma Scale. Self-efficacy (perceived self efficacy regarding the ability to carry out the regimen and perceived efficacy outcomes) was measured using an investigator-developed instrument. The associations among these variables were analyzed using Pearson R. The findings demonstrated significant negative associations between depression and perceived self-efficacy (r=-.586, p=.000) and between depression and perceived efficacy outcomes (r=-.326, p=.005). Likewise, a significant negative relationship was found between perceived stigma and perceived self-efficacy (r=-.441, p=.000), and between perceived self-efficacy and the perceived stigma subscales of disclosure (r=-.271, p=020), negative self-image (r=-.513, p=000), and perceptions of public attitude (r=-.280, p=.016). Depression and perceived stigma are important factors that may affect self efficacy, and thus may affect a PLWHIV's ability to adhere. Since the incidence of depression among PLWHIV is high, depression should be addressed before initiating therapy. Assisting patients to identify support systems may help offset their view of the negative societal acceptability of their illness. Understanding these relationships will enable health care providers to provide evidence-based care to this population and give patients the best opportunity for an optimal response to HIV therapies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:41Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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