Feasibility of using cardiac event records following discharge after cardiac surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163622
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feasibility of using cardiac event records following discharge after cardiac surgery
Author(s):
Funk, Marjorie; Baczewski, Violet M.; Wilcox, Heather
Author Details:
Marjorie Funk, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: marjorie.funk@yale.edu; Violet M. Baczewski; Heather Wilcox
Abstract:
Cardiac event recorders (CER) are small, pager-size monitoring devices that attach to the chest with 2 paste-on electrodes. Although they are increasingly being used for long-term ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring, little is known about patients' reactions to these devices. Purpose: As part of a study examining atrial fibrillation (AF) after cardiac surgery, we also evaluated the feasibility of using CERs. Specific Aims: The aims of this study were to describe: 1) how patients felt about using a CER; 2) how adept they were at using it; and 3) why some patients withdrew from or declined to participate in a study in which they were asked to wear a CER. Methods: In the parent study, 302 patient who had undergone cardiac surgery were monitored for AF with CERs for 2 weeks following discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to wear the CER continuously and to record and transmit their ECG rhythm transtelephonically to a member of the research team once a day and whenever they had symptoms suggestive of AF. The member of the research team receiving the transmissions completed a brief questionnaire addressing the patient's skill in using the CER, and patients completed a CER evaluation form at the end of the 2 weeks. Results: The sample was 73% male and 94% white, with a mean age of 63.6 +/- 10.8 years (range: 24 - 91 years); 42% had postoperative AF. Most (80%) always wore the CER; 67% found it convenient, but 25% found it inconvenient to wear while sleeping; 85% had no trouble recording and transmitting their rhythm; and 91% said the CER made them feel more safe and secure. Of the 302 patients, 40 (13%) withdrew from the study before the 2 weeks had elapsed. Of the 40, 23 were rehospitalized, 7 did not like wearing the CER, and 5 had skin irritation form the paste-on electrodes. Of the 494 patients who were approached to participate in the study, 192 (39%) declined. The most common reasons for declining were feeling overwhelmed and hassled (32%), lack of interest (27%), and not wanting to deal with any more wires or patches (21%). Conclusions and Implications for Practice: A vast majority of patients had no trouble wearing or using the CER, and reported enhanced feelings of safety. Some found it inconvenient to wear while sleeping, and a small number did not like it and withdrew from the study. Use of a CER is feasible and is recommended for patients at high risk for developing postoperative dysrhythmias.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeasibility of using cardiac event records following discharge after cardiac surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Marjorieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaczewski, Violet M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilcox, Heatheren_US
dc.author.detailsMarjorie Funk, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: marjorie.funk@yale.edu; Violet M. Baczewski; Heather Wilcoxen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163622-
dc.description.abstractCardiac event recorders (CER) are small, pager-size monitoring devices that attach to the chest with 2 paste-on electrodes. Although they are increasingly being used for long-term ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring, little is known about patients' reactions to these devices. Purpose: As part of a study examining atrial fibrillation (AF) after cardiac surgery, we also evaluated the feasibility of using CERs. Specific Aims: The aims of this study were to describe: 1) how patients felt about using a CER; 2) how adept they were at using it; and 3) why some patients withdrew from or declined to participate in a study in which they were asked to wear a CER. Methods: In the parent study, 302 patient who had undergone cardiac surgery were monitored for AF with CERs for 2 weeks following discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to wear the CER continuously and to record and transmit their ECG rhythm transtelephonically to a member of the research team once a day and whenever they had symptoms suggestive of AF. The member of the research team receiving the transmissions completed a brief questionnaire addressing the patient's skill in using the CER, and patients completed a CER evaluation form at the end of the 2 weeks. Results: The sample was 73% male and 94% white, with a mean age of 63.6 +/- 10.8 years (range: 24 - 91 years); 42% had postoperative AF. Most (80%) always wore the CER; 67% found it convenient, but 25% found it inconvenient to wear while sleeping; 85% had no trouble recording and transmitting their rhythm; and 91% said the CER made them feel more safe and secure. Of the 302 patients, 40 (13%) withdrew from the study before the 2 weeks had elapsed. Of the 40, 23 were rehospitalized, 7 did not like wearing the CER, and 5 had skin irritation form the paste-on electrodes. Of the 494 patients who were approached to participate in the study, 192 (39%) declined. The most common reasons for declining were feeling overwhelmed and hassled (32%), lack of interest (27%), and not wanting to deal with any more wires or patches (21%). Conclusions and Implications for Practice: A vast majority of patients had no trouble wearing or using the CER, and reported enhanced feelings of safety. Some found it inconvenient to wear while sleeping, and a small number did not like it and withdrew from the study. Use of a CER is feasible and is recommended for patients at high risk for developing postoperative dysrhythmias.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:49Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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