2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163625
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal-student role stress during concurrent transitions
Author(s):
Gigliotti, Eileen
Author Details:
Eileen Gigliotti, Staten Island, New York, USA, email: gigliotti@mail.csi.cuny.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Women aged 35-49 years comprise 15% of the female undergraduate population on US campuses and many are mothers. Shifting role relationships during this time of situational and developmental transition make them vulnerable to maternal-student role stress (MSRS) and its attendant health risks. To engage in health promoting strategies, the etiology of MSRS must be identified. This paper reports the contributions of two factors: psychological involvement in the maternal and student roles (MRI/SRI) and total network support (TNS). Research Question: What are the relations amongst maternal and student role involvement, total network support, and maternal-student role stress for women in concurrent situational/developmental transition? Framework: This situation-specific theory of MSRS was created by linking Neuman's systems model, role and social support theory, and Meleis' transition framework. Mid-life developmental transition is a tension-creating stressor that may inspire women who are mothers to add the student role, a situational transition/concurrent stressor. Psychological involvement in a role makes one emotionally sensitive to role problems and social support from a diverse network buffers this sensitivity. Thus, high psychological involvement increases MSRS potential and network support decreases this same potential. Also, these variables interact. That is, high psychological role involvement in the presence of low total network support increases MSRS potential. Methods: Two subsamples of women: 37 years and older (n = 62) and < 37 years (n = 73) were closely matched on all other transition conditions. With human subjects approval, participants voluntarily completed the Perceived Multiple Role Stress Scale, The Maternal and Student Role Involvement Questionnaires and the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire and returned these via pre-paid mail. Response rate was 43%. Main and interaction effects were analyzed using multiple regression. Results/Conclusions: Though younger women reported slightly more MSRS than older women (t=2.27,p < .025), the study variables explained 29% of MSRS variance for older women and nothing for younger women. In women aged 37 years and older, MRI and TNS contributed 15% and the interaction between high SRI and low TNS contributed a unique 14%. No main or interaction effects were present in the younger age group. The findings are congruent with both Neuman's and Meleis' propositions. Implications: Women's transitions are linked to their health experience and Healthy People 2010 has identified college health initiatives as a main objective. Because TNS decreases MSRS for women in concurrent transitions, it is recommended that Socialization Enhancement (NIC) be investigated as a potentially viable nursing intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal-student role stress during concurrent transitionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGigliotti, Eileenen_US
dc.author.detailsEileen Gigliotti, Staten Island, New York, USA, email: gigliotti@mail.csi.cuny.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163625-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Women aged 35-49 years comprise 15% of the female undergraduate population on US campuses and many are mothers. Shifting role relationships during this time of situational and developmental transition make them vulnerable to maternal-student role stress (MSRS) and its attendant health risks. To engage in health promoting strategies, the etiology of MSRS must be identified. This paper reports the contributions of two factors: psychological involvement in the maternal and student roles (MRI/SRI) and total network support (TNS). Research Question: What are the relations amongst maternal and student role involvement, total network support, and maternal-student role stress for women in concurrent situational/developmental transition? Framework: This situation-specific theory of MSRS was created by linking Neuman's systems model, role and social support theory, and Meleis' transition framework. Mid-life developmental transition is a tension-creating stressor that may inspire women who are mothers to add the student role, a situational transition/concurrent stressor. Psychological involvement in a role makes one emotionally sensitive to role problems and social support from a diverse network buffers this sensitivity. Thus, high psychological involvement increases MSRS potential and network support decreases this same potential. Also, these variables interact. That is, high psychological role involvement in the presence of low total network support increases MSRS potential. Methods: Two subsamples of women: 37 years and older (n = 62) and < 37 years (n = 73) were closely matched on all other transition conditions. With human subjects approval, participants voluntarily completed the Perceived Multiple Role Stress Scale, The Maternal and Student Role Involvement Questionnaires and the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire and returned these via pre-paid mail. Response rate was 43%. Main and interaction effects were analyzed using multiple regression. Results/Conclusions: Though younger women reported slightly more MSRS than older women (t=2.27,p < .025), the study variables explained 29% of MSRS variance for older women and nothing for younger women. In women aged 37 years and older, MRI and TNS contributed 15% and the interaction between high SRI and low TNS contributed a unique 14%. No main or interaction effects were present in the younger age group. The findings are congruent with both Neuman's and Meleis' propositions. Implications: Women's transitions are linked to their health experience and Healthy People 2010 has identified college health initiatives as a main objective. Because TNS decreases MSRS for women in concurrent transitions, it is recommended that Socialization Enhancement (NIC) be investigated as a potentially viable nursing intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:53Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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