Sorting out pieces of the puzzle: A grounded theory analysis of the process of mothering with postpartum dysphoria

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163626
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sorting out pieces of the puzzle: A grounded theory analysis of the process of mothering with postpartum dysphoria
Author(s):
Goodman, Janice; Horowitz, June A.
Author Details:
Janice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu; June A. Horowitz
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the process of mothering among a group of women who experienced postpartum dysphoria (mild clinical depression or self-reported depression symptoms). Research Questions: What are women's perceptions of their postpartum dysphoria in relation to their mothering experiences during the early months after delivery? How do women understand the processes involved in mothering and emerging from postpartum dysphoria or struggling with ongoing depression symptoms 2-3 years after delivery? Framework: Symbolic interactionism provides the foundation for grounded theory based on the premise that human action depends upon the meanings that people ascribe to their situations. These meanings evolve from shared interactions that depend on language and social context, and are constantly recreated through human interaction. The grounded theorist aims to discover and conceptualize the essence of complex interactional processes by examining shifts in, influences on, and perceptions of experience and elucidating how these shape the basic social processes. Methods: This study is part of a mixed-method, longitudinal investigation of the course of maternal dysphoria and its relationship to parental stress, children's behavioral/emotional health, and perceptions of postpartum and mothering experiences. Participants for this qualitative component are recruited from an original sample of 117 mothers who had elevated depression symptom scores depressed at 2-4 weeks postpartum. Interview questions focus on eliciting mothers' understandings of (a) the meaning of their postpartum depression symptoms, (b) the factors that contributed to resolution or continuation of symptoms, and (c) the connections among previous and/or current dysphoria and their maternal-child relationship and parenting. Each interview is audiotaped and transcribed. Consistent with grounded theory method, data analysis began with the first transcript and will continue concurrently with sampling and data collection throughout the study. Results: At present, researchers have interviewed 14 mothers who are 2 to 3 years post delivery using a flexible, in-depth, open-ended, semi-structured interview guide. Coding and analysis are in progress. Analysis and interviewing will continue until theoretical saturation has occurred. Relationships among constructs will be developed into a substantive theory of the course, meaning, and consequences of postpartum depression on perceptions and experiences of mothering. Implications for Nursing: This qualitative study will generate a substantive theory concerning the process of mothering while with dysphoria. Because interpretations of meanings are amenable to change and introduction of successful experiences can lead to more positive thinking, interventions tailored to ameliorate maternal dysphoria could result from this line of inquiry.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSorting out pieces of the puzzle: A grounded theory analysis of the process of mothering with postpartum dysphoriaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu; June A. Horowitzen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163626-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the process of mothering among a group of women who experienced postpartum dysphoria (mild clinical depression or self-reported depression symptoms). Research Questions: What are women's perceptions of their postpartum dysphoria in relation to their mothering experiences during the early months after delivery? How do women understand the processes involved in mothering and emerging from postpartum dysphoria or struggling with ongoing depression symptoms 2-3 years after delivery? Framework: Symbolic interactionism provides the foundation for grounded theory based on the premise that human action depends upon the meanings that people ascribe to their situations. These meanings evolve from shared interactions that depend on language and social context, and are constantly recreated through human interaction. The grounded theorist aims to discover and conceptualize the essence of complex interactional processes by examining shifts in, influences on, and perceptions of experience and elucidating how these shape the basic social processes. Methods: This study is part of a mixed-method, longitudinal investigation of the course of maternal dysphoria and its relationship to parental stress, children's behavioral/emotional health, and perceptions of postpartum and mothering experiences. Participants for this qualitative component are recruited from an original sample of 117 mothers who had elevated depression symptom scores depressed at 2-4 weeks postpartum. Interview questions focus on eliciting mothers' understandings of (a) the meaning of their postpartum depression symptoms, (b) the factors that contributed to resolution or continuation of symptoms, and (c) the connections among previous and/or current dysphoria and their maternal-child relationship and parenting. Each interview is audiotaped and transcribed. Consistent with grounded theory method, data analysis began with the first transcript and will continue concurrently with sampling and data collection throughout the study. Results: At present, researchers have interviewed 14 mothers who are 2 to 3 years post delivery using a flexible, in-depth, open-ended, semi-structured interview guide. Coding and analysis are in progress. Analysis and interviewing will continue until theoretical saturation has occurred. Relationships among constructs will be developed into a substantive theory of the course, meaning, and consequences of postpartum depression on perceptions and experiences of mothering. Implications for Nursing: This qualitative study will generate a substantive theory concerning the process of mothering while with dysphoria. Because interpretations of meanings are amenable to change and introduction of successful experiences can lead to more positive thinking, interventions tailored to ameliorate maternal dysphoria could result from this line of inquiry.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:54Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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