2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163627
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A narrative study of unaccompanied refugees from Sudan
Author(s):
Goodman, Janice
Author Details:
Janice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore how unaccompanied minor refugee youth, who have grown up amidst violence and loss, make sense of their past and present experiences Specific Aims: (1) To document the life stories of unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees. (2) To identify strategies unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees have used to endure and overcome challenges in their lives. (3) To identify the potential mental health needs of unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees in adjusting to their new life in the United States. Framework: A stress and adaptation framework, and narrative theory, provide the guiding concepts for this study. The influence of culture and experience on the stress and adaptation of refugee children is considered. Narratives, while unique, also contain patterns and themes that reflect a shared social, cultural, and historical context. Listening to stories provides rich information about both individuals and groups. Methods: This research uses a descriptive narrative approach to the data collection and analysis of semi-structured, open-ended interviews with recently arrived unaccompanied Sudanese refugee adolescents in the U.S. Participants are asked to tell about their past and present, the difficulties they have faced, their attributions for these difficulties, their ways of coping, their perceived needs, and their hopes for the future. Interviews are audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, including significant nonverbal features of the conversation. Narrative data will be analyzed using descriptive narrative techniques suggested by Riessman (1993) and Mishler (1995) to produce a report of the interpretive schemes that study participants used to create the significance and meanings of past events and to anticipate their future. The narratives will be analyzed in regards to the overall goals a narrator is trying to accomplish, the linguistic devices used to make his/her points, and the content and themes. The core narrative plots of these individuals who share common life events will be compared. A Sudanese research assistant has been employed to assist in obtaining informed consent and to check interpretations on an ongoing basis to guard against cultural misinterpretation and to serve as a resource for clarification of cultural and language issues. Results: Twelve interviews have been conducted thus far, with more planned. Preliminary analysis has begun. Implications for Nursing: Refugees represent a rapidly growing population in need of health care services. Nursing research with refugees is essential to develop nursing knowledge and to inform nursing practice to improve the quality of care for refugees. Results from this study will be useful for identifying the mental health strengths and needs of unaccompanied refugee minors and for developing appropriate interventions. This study will provide information with implications for refugee and immigrant groups in general, as well as contributing to the body of literature on stress, coping, and adaptation. Although the experiences and needs of Sudanese refugee children are unique, their situation has implications for the mental health of children worldwide who have experienced war, violence, and extreme loss.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA narrative study of unaccompanied refugees from Sudanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Janiceen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Goodman, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA, USA, email: jgoodman@mghihp.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163627-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore how unaccompanied minor refugee youth, who have grown up amidst violence and loss, make sense of their past and present experiences Specific Aims: (1) To document the life stories of unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees. (2) To identify strategies unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees have used to endure and overcome challenges in their lives. (3) To identify the potential mental health needs of unaccompanied Sudanese adolescent refugees in adjusting to their new life in the United States. Framework: A stress and adaptation framework, and narrative theory, provide the guiding concepts for this study. The influence of culture and experience on the stress and adaptation of refugee children is considered. Narratives, while unique, also contain patterns and themes that reflect a shared social, cultural, and historical context. Listening to stories provides rich information about both individuals and groups. Methods: This research uses a descriptive narrative approach to the data collection and analysis of semi-structured, open-ended interviews with recently arrived unaccompanied Sudanese refugee adolescents in the U.S. Participants are asked to tell about their past and present, the difficulties they have faced, their attributions for these difficulties, their ways of coping, their perceived needs, and their hopes for the future. Interviews are audiotaped and transcribed verbatim, including significant nonverbal features of the conversation. Narrative data will be analyzed using descriptive narrative techniques suggested by Riessman (1993) and Mishler (1995) to produce a report of the interpretive schemes that study participants used to create the significance and meanings of past events and to anticipate their future. The narratives will be analyzed in regards to the overall goals a narrator is trying to accomplish, the linguistic devices used to make his/her points, and the content and themes. The core narrative plots of these individuals who share common life events will be compared. A Sudanese research assistant has been employed to assist in obtaining informed consent and to check interpretations on an ongoing basis to guard against cultural misinterpretation and to serve as a resource for clarification of cultural and language issues. Results: Twelve interviews have been conducted thus far, with more planned. Preliminary analysis has begun. Implications for Nursing: Refugees represent a rapidly growing population in need of health care services. Nursing research with refugees is essential to develop nursing knowledge and to inform nursing practice to improve the quality of care for refugees. Results from this study will be useful for identifying the mental health strengths and needs of unaccompanied refugee minors and for developing appropriate interventions. This study will provide information with implications for refugee and immigrant groups in general, as well as contributing to the body of literature on stress, coping, and adaptation. Although the experiences and needs of Sudanese refugee children are unique, their situation has implications for the mental health of children worldwide who have experienced war, violence, and extreme loss.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:55Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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