The effect of degrees of backrest elevation upon cardiac output utilizing continuous cardiac output measurement

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163628
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effect of degrees of backrest elevation upon cardiac output utilizing continuous cardiac output measurement
Author(s):
Guiliano, Karen; Scott, Susan S.
Author Details:
Karen Giuliano, RN, FAAN, Clinical Research Specialist, Boston College Connell School of Nursing, Salem, New Hampshire, USA, email: Karen.Giuliano@philips.com; Susan S. Scott
Abstract:
Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of varying degrees of backrest elevation on cardiac output in order to determine the reproducibility of cardiac output measurements in critically ill patients at various head of bed elevations. Research Questions: Is there a difference between cardiac output values measured at different head-of bed degrees (0, 30, 45)? Is there a difference between cardiac output values measured at different head-of bed degrees (0, 30, 45) and at different time intervals (5 minutes and 10 minutes after a position change)? Methods: Data was collected in 24-bed Medical/Surgical/Trauma Intensive Care Unit in a university-affiliated Level 1 trauma center. A continuous cardiac output (CCO) PA catheter was used for all CO measurements (Baxter model#139H-7.5F). All catheters were calibrated, zero-balanced, and leveled to the phlebostatic axis (4th ICS, midaxillary line) immediately prior to all measurements. A repeated-measures, convenience sample (N=26), with-in-subject ANOVA was used. Results: Cardiac Output (l/min) Mean SD Sign. Effect size 0 minutes; 0 degrees 7.48 2.01 NS* .169 0 minutes; 30 degrees 7.54 2.03 5 minutes; 30 degrees 7.51 2.03 10 minutes; 30 degrees 7.52 2.03 0 minutes; 45 degrees 7.45 1.92 5 minutes; 45 degrees 7.40 1.8 10 minutes; 45 degrees 7.36 1.80 *p< 0.01 Discussion: The results indicated that there was no overall statistical difference in CCO values at the various head-of-bed heights, even when adjusted for patient acuity. In addition, examination of the mean values indicated that there were also no clinically meaningful differences in the CCO values. Finally, the small effect sizes further highlight that the changes in patient position had little effect on the CCO values across the different head-of bed heights and time intervals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effect of degrees of backrest elevation upon cardiac output utilizing continuous cardiac output measurementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuiliano, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorScott, Susan S.en_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Giuliano, RN, FAAN, Clinical Research Specialist, Boston College Connell School of Nursing, Salem, New Hampshire, USA, email: Karen.Giuliano@philips.com; Susan S. Scotten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163628-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of varying degrees of backrest elevation on cardiac output in order to determine the reproducibility of cardiac output measurements in critically ill patients at various head of bed elevations. Research Questions: Is there a difference between cardiac output values measured at different head-of bed degrees (0, 30, 45)? Is there a difference between cardiac output values measured at different head-of bed degrees (0, 30, 45) and at different time intervals (5 minutes and 10 minutes after a position change)? Methods: Data was collected in 24-bed Medical/Surgical/Trauma Intensive Care Unit in a university-affiliated Level 1 trauma center. A continuous cardiac output (CCO) PA catheter was used for all CO measurements (Baxter model#139H-7.5F). All catheters were calibrated, zero-balanced, and leveled to the phlebostatic axis (4th ICS, midaxillary line) immediately prior to all measurements. A repeated-measures, convenience sample (N=26), with-in-subject ANOVA was used. Results: Cardiac Output (l/min) Mean SD Sign. Effect size 0 minutes; 0 degrees 7.48 2.01 NS* .169 0 minutes; 30 degrees 7.54 2.03 5 minutes; 30 degrees 7.51 2.03 10 minutes; 30 degrees 7.52 2.03 0 minutes; 45 degrees 7.45 1.92 5 minutes; 45 degrees 7.40 1.8 10 minutes; 45 degrees 7.36 1.80 *p< 0.01 Discussion: The results indicated that there was no overall statistical difference in CCO values at the various head-of-bed heights, even when adjusted for patient acuity. In addition, examination of the mean values indicated that there were also no clinically meaningful differences in the CCO values. Finally, the small effect sizes further highlight that the changes in patient position had little effect on the CCO values across the different head-of bed heights and time intervals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:56Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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