2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163630
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of an adult psychiatric inpatient satisfaction survey (AIPSS)
Author(s):
Haack, Marsha; Woodring, Sharon; Nunn, Richard
Author Details:
Marsha Haack,Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mhaack@psu.ed; Sharon Woodring; Richard Nunn
Abstract:
Purpose: This performance improvement (PI) project was designed to test and utilize a patient satisfaction measure to assess perceptions of excellence in care, quality of patent services, patient participation and decision-making and the effectiveness of psychiatric team interventions. Specific Aims: To determine the psychometric properties of a patient satisfaction measure, to examine patients' perceptions of the quality of their psychiatric care, and to utilize the results to direct interdisciplinary patient plans of care. Framework: The conceptualization of this instrument was modeled after work by Kast and Rosenzweig, who identified five subsystems within the organization, which include cultural, technical, structural, psychosocial and managerial. Methods: The 15-item Likert scale (-2 Strongly Disagree to 2 Strongly Agree) AIPSS was completed by 674 patients prior to discharge during the period of Oct. 1999 to March 2001. Patients also indicated aspects of care that were most and least helpful and rated the appropriateness of the length of hospital stay (LOS). Anonymity and confidentiality were protected. Patients were not required to record their age range, gender, date of discharge or any identifiable information. Patients placed the survey forms in a sealed box, which was not accessible to staff. Five-hundred and sixty-three patients did report their gender (161 males; 402 females) and all reported their age range (n=255 were 19 to 40). Results and Conclusions: High internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94; N=604) was established for the 15 items. A Principal Component Varimax factor analysis revealed only 2 factors, which explained 61.6% of the variance in the total score. Two subscales were formed and named-The Professional Care and Milieu Subscale and The Treatment Issues Subscale. Overall, patients reported the least amount of satisfaction with the benefits of therapeutic treatment goals (mean .82 +/- SD 1.2) and feeling that their interpersonal relationships improved as a result of their hospitalization (.90 +/- 1.02). Greatest satisfaction was associated with staff friendliness (1.3 +/- .99), feeling safe (1.27 +/- 1.02), staff attentiveness (1.22 +/- 1.01), and involvement in discharge planning (1.2 +/- 1.01). Staff friendliness was also perceived as the most helpful in their recovery. Most patients (n=460) felt that their LOS was just right, while only 48 indicated that it was too short and 105 too long. The AIPSS measure is a reliable and valid instrument to assess patient perceptions of their care and treatment progress. Implications: Patient satisfaction data provide critical information in evaluating the effectiveness of treatment plans and establishing important priorities for patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of an adult psychiatric inpatient satisfaction survey (AIPSS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaack, Marshaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodring, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorNunn, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsMarsha Haack,Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mhaack@psu.ed; Sharon Woodring; Richard Nunnen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163630-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This performance improvement (PI) project was designed to test and utilize a patient satisfaction measure to assess perceptions of excellence in care, quality of patent services, patient participation and decision-making and the effectiveness of psychiatric team interventions. Specific Aims: To determine the psychometric properties of a patient satisfaction measure, to examine patients' perceptions of the quality of their psychiatric care, and to utilize the results to direct interdisciplinary patient plans of care. Framework: The conceptualization of this instrument was modeled after work by Kast and Rosenzweig, who identified five subsystems within the organization, which include cultural, technical, structural, psychosocial and managerial. Methods: The 15-item Likert scale (-2 Strongly Disagree to 2 Strongly Agree) AIPSS was completed by 674 patients prior to discharge during the period of Oct. 1999 to March 2001. Patients also indicated aspects of care that were most and least helpful and rated the appropriateness of the length of hospital stay (LOS). Anonymity and confidentiality were protected. Patients were not required to record their age range, gender, date of discharge or any identifiable information. Patients placed the survey forms in a sealed box, which was not accessible to staff. Five-hundred and sixty-three patients did report their gender (161 males; 402 females) and all reported their age range (n=255 were 19 to 40). Results and Conclusions: High internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94; N=604) was established for the 15 items. A Principal Component Varimax factor analysis revealed only 2 factors, which explained 61.6% of the variance in the total score. Two subscales were formed and named-The Professional Care and Milieu Subscale and The Treatment Issues Subscale. Overall, patients reported the least amount of satisfaction with the benefits of therapeutic treatment goals (mean .82 +/- SD 1.2) and feeling that their interpersonal relationships improved as a result of their hospitalization (.90 +/- 1.02). Greatest satisfaction was associated with staff friendliness (1.3 +/- .99), feeling safe (1.27 +/- 1.02), staff attentiveness (1.22 +/- 1.01), and involvement in discharge planning (1.2 +/- 1.01). Staff friendliness was also perceived as the most helpful in their recovery. Most patients (n=460) felt that their LOS was just right, while only 48 indicated that it was too short and 105 too long. The AIPSS measure is a reliable and valid instrument to assess patient perceptions of their care and treatment progress. Implications: Patient satisfaction data provide critical information in evaluating the effectiveness of treatment plans and establishing important priorities for patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:58Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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