2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163631
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Informed nursing practice: A model academic-community diabetes partnership
Author(s):
Hall-Long, Bethany; Bucher, Gale
Author Details:
Bethany Hall-Long, Associate Professor, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Middletown, Delaware, USA, email: blong@udel.edu; Gale Bucher
Abstract:
Purpose, Aims, and Framework/Design Delaware has the eighth highest diabetes mortality rate in the nation. Over 8% of Delaware's residents and one in six inpatient clients of the state's largest, non-profit health care system, Christiana Care, are known diabetics. In response to this public health problem, an academic-community research-service partnership was formed. The partners include the University of Delaware's College of Health and Nursing Sciences and Christiana Care Health System's Visiting Nurse Association (VNA). This partnership has created a research-based diabetes disease management program in the home. The partnership is funded by the National Diabetes Action Research Education Foundation. The purpose of this evaluation research study was to examine the relative effectiveness of a home health education intervention on the knowledge and self management behaviors of adult diabetics in Delaware. The Michigan Diabetes Education Practice and Research Guidelines serve as the study' framework. Methods A purposive sample (n=56) of VNA clients was used. Clients with brain disorder, stroke, and terminal cancer were excluded. All clients provided written consent. The clients ranged in age from 16 - 88, and there were 27 males and 29 females, and of these 55% were white, 40% were black, and 5% were other. VNA nurses, certified diabetes nurse educators and undergraduate UD student nurses' conducted the intervention. This occurred for 6 - 12 months per client/family and included: weekly home visits with structured diabetes education sessions, data collection, and telephone follow-up. The focus was on individual self-management and family support to enhance lifestyle functioning for health promotion. Clients were referred to appropriate community resources VNA staff nurses and student nurses simultaneously collected data. These data included client physical & psychosocial history, diet, exercise, self-blood glucose monitoring (SBGM), foot care, medication, and medical follow-up. Data collection instruments included: the Mini Mental State Exam, the Michigan Diabetes Research Training Center's Diabetes Tests (knowledge, attitudes), a 24 hour recall dietary log, a weekly activity/weight sheet, and SBGM records. The VNA nursing records served as secondary documentation for self-management behaviors and health outcomes. Dietetics, nursing, and exercise science faculty and students collaborate with VNA nurses, social workers, physical therapists and other health providers as needed. Appropriate parametric and non-parametric tests were used to analyze the data. Results, Conclusions and Implications Thirty-three percent of the clients reported an overall "increase in well-being" and reported making 4-6 less visits to their doctor or health provider "as usual" over the course of the study. Forty percent reported an increase in the self-management behaviors of SBGM, medical follow-up, medication compliance, and diet/exercise. Forty-five percent reported that they had improved their dietary monitoring. The ongoing telephone and personal follow-up interventions was listed as the leading form of support and motivation. Given the nature of the design, study findings cannot be generalized, but offers a replicable a campus-community partnership for informed practice. The paper provides implications for research to design programs for health promotion in the future. These include the effectiveness of diabetes management programs in the home on costs, quality, and access to care, and overall client outcomes. The presentation concludes with energizing tips for the replication of this research-service-education partnership in diverse settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformed nursing practice: A model academic-community diabetes partnershipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHall-Long, Bethanyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBucher, Galeen_US
dc.author.detailsBethany Hall-Long, Associate Professor, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Middletown, Delaware, USA, email: blong@udel.edu; Gale Bucheren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163631-
dc.description.abstractPurpose, Aims, and Framework/Design Delaware has the eighth highest diabetes mortality rate in the nation. Over 8% of Delaware's residents and one in six inpatient clients of the state's largest, non-profit health care system, Christiana Care, are known diabetics. In response to this public health problem, an academic-community research-service partnership was formed. The partners include the University of Delaware's College of Health and Nursing Sciences and Christiana Care Health System's Visiting Nurse Association (VNA). This partnership has created a research-based diabetes disease management program in the home. The partnership is funded by the National Diabetes Action Research Education Foundation. The purpose of this evaluation research study was to examine the relative effectiveness of a home health education intervention on the knowledge and self management behaviors of adult diabetics in Delaware. The Michigan Diabetes Education Practice and Research Guidelines serve as the study' framework. Methods A purposive sample (n=56) of VNA clients was used. Clients with brain disorder, stroke, and terminal cancer were excluded. All clients provided written consent. The clients ranged in age from 16 - 88, and there were 27 males and 29 females, and of these 55% were white, 40% were black, and 5% were other. VNA nurses, certified diabetes nurse educators and undergraduate UD student nurses' conducted the intervention. This occurred for 6 - 12 months per client/family and included: weekly home visits with structured diabetes education sessions, data collection, and telephone follow-up. The focus was on individual self-management and family support to enhance lifestyle functioning for health promotion. Clients were referred to appropriate community resources VNA staff nurses and student nurses simultaneously collected data. These data included client physical & psychosocial history, diet, exercise, self-blood glucose monitoring (SBGM), foot care, medication, and medical follow-up. Data collection instruments included: the Mini Mental State Exam, the Michigan Diabetes Research Training Center's Diabetes Tests (knowledge, attitudes), a 24 hour recall dietary log, a weekly activity/weight sheet, and SBGM records. The VNA nursing records served as secondary documentation for self-management behaviors and health outcomes. Dietetics, nursing, and exercise science faculty and students collaborate with VNA nurses, social workers, physical therapists and other health providers as needed. Appropriate parametric and non-parametric tests were used to analyze the data. Results, Conclusions and Implications Thirty-three percent of the clients reported an overall "increase in well-being" and reported making 4-6 less visits to their doctor or health provider "as usual" over the course of the study. Forty percent reported an increase in the self-management behaviors of SBGM, medical follow-up, medication compliance, and diet/exercise. Forty-five percent reported that they had improved their dietary monitoring. The ongoing telephone and personal follow-up interventions was listed as the leading form of support and motivation. Given the nature of the design, study findings cannot be generalized, but offers a replicable a campus-community partnership for informed practice. The paper provides implications for research to design programs for health promotion in the future. These include the effectiveness of diabetes management programs in the home on costs, quality, and access to care, and overall client outcomes. The presentation concludes with energizing tips for the replication of this research-service-education partnership in diverse settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:10:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:10:59Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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