Development and psychometric evaluation of the Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale (MNMDS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163634
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and psychometric evaluation of the Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale (MNMDS)
Author(s):
Harvey, Rose; Hurley, Ann C.; Fry, Sara T.; Duffy, Mary E.; Foley, Barbara Jo
Author Details:
Rose Harvey, Adjunct Associate Professor, Northeastern University, Bouve' College of Health Sciences, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, email: r.harvey@neu.edu; Ann C. Hurley; Sara T. Fry; Mary E. Duffy; Barbara Jo Foley
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate a scale to measure military nursing moral distress. Specific Aims: To establish the reliability and validity of the MNMDS. Framework: The project was guided by a conceptual model of moral distress derived from previous research and a review of the literature. Design: The scale was tested with a sample of U.S. Army Nurse Corps officers who were crisis deployed (n=529), and non-crisis deployed (n=430). [Crisis deployment was defined as having supported operations off station (and perhaps out of country) to provide nursing care during war, military operations, humanitarian, and/or peacekeeping missions.] Methods: The project steps were to: (1) identify the phenomenon of moral distress in military nurses' (n =34) stories of patient care experiences while crisis deployed, (2) describe the dimensions of moral distress, (3) write and validate items to represent the dimensions of moral distress, and (4) evaluate the scale's psychometric properties. Focus group discussions and quantitative content validity evaluation were used to determine the degree to which the scale items were relevant and applicable for use with military nurses in crisis deployment situations. Institutional Review Boards at Northeastern University and Army Medical Centers approved the project. Results and Conclusions: Psychometric analysis of the MNMDS was performed on data from military nurses who were crisis deployed (n = 529). An item total correlation of .5 was set for inclusion in the scale. As a result, 25 items were retained from the original 82-item scale. Principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization of the 25-item scale resulted in a three-factor solution with all 25 items loading at .4 or greater, explaining 49.8 % of the variance. The three factors were: Effects and Consequences, Initial Distress, and Reactive Distress. Cronbach's coefficient alphas for the three factors ranged from .80 to .90. A comparison of the deployed and non-deployed samples using the independent T-test showed nurses not crisis deployed to have significantly lower MNMDS scores than those who were crisis deployed, supporting the scale's construct validity. Principal components analysis of the MNMDS confirmed the original, conceptually derived dimensions of military moral distress. Implications: The results of psychometric evaluation show that the MNMDS is a reliable and valid measure of the military moral distress phenomenon among Army Nurse Corps officers who have been crisis deployed. Evidence of the scale's reliability and validity indicates that researchers can confidently use the MNMDS; however, further refinement and use in other military nurse populations with unique crisis deployment situations (i.e., Navy and Air Force) is strongly suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and psychometric evaluation of the Military Nursing Moral Distress Scale (MNMDS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFry, Sara T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFoley, Barbara Joen_US
dc.author.detailsRose Harvey, Adjunct Associate Professor, Northeastern University, Bouve' College of Health Sciences, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA, email: r.harvey@neu.edu; Ann C. Hurley; Sara T. Fry; Mary E. Duffy; Barbara Jo Foleyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163634-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to develop and evaluate a scale to measure military nursing moral distress. Specific Aims: To establish the reliability and validity of the MNMDS. Framework: The project was guided by a conceptual model of moral distress derived from previous research and a review of the literature. Design: The scale was tested with a sample of U.S. Army Nurse Corps officers who were crisis deployed (n=529), and non-crisis deployed (n=430). [Crisis deployment was defined as having supported operations off station (and perhaps out of country) to provide nursing care during war, military operations, humanitarian, and/or peacekeeping missions.] Methods: The project steps were to: (1) identify the phenomenon of moral distress in military nurses' (n =34) stories of patient care experiences while crisis deployed, (2) describe the dimensions of moral distress, (3) write and validate items to represent the dimensions of moral distress, and (4) evaluate the scale's psychometric properties. Focus group discussions and quantitative content validity evaluation were used to determine the degree to which the scale items were relevant and applicable for use with military nurses in crisis deployment situations. Institutional Review Boards at Northeastern University and Army Medical Centers approved the project. Results and Conclusions: Psychometric analysis of the MNMDS was performed on data from military nurses who were crisis deployed (n = 529). An item total correlation of .5 was set for inclusion in the scale. As a result, 25 items were retained from the original 82-item scale. Principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization of the 25-item scale resulted in a three-factor solution with all 25 items loading at .4 or greater, explaining 49.8 % of the variance. The three factors were: Effects and Consequences, Initial Distress, and Reactive Distress. Cronbach's coefficient alphas for the three factors ranged from .80 to .90. A comparison of the deployed and non-deployed samples using the independent T-test showed nurses not crisis deployed to have significantly lower MNMDS scores than those who were crisis deployed, supporting the scale's construct validity. Principal components analysis of the MNMDS confirmed the original, conceptually derived dimensions of military moral distress. Implications: The results of psychometric evaluation show that the MNMDS is a reliable and valid measure of the military moral distress phenomenon among Army Nurse Corps officers who have been crisis deployed. Evidence of the scale's reliability and validity indicates that researchers can confidently use the MNMDS; however, further refinement and use in other military nurse populations with unique crisis deployment situations (i.e., Navy and Air Force) is strongly suggested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:02Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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