2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163636
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison of stroke risk factors in men and women with disabilities
Author(s):
Hinkle, Janice; Smith, Rosalind; Revere, Karen
Author Details:
Janice Hinkle, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: janice.hinkle@villanova.edu; Rosalind Smith; Karen Revere
Abstract:
Early recognition and treatment for stroke uses health promotion efforts that focus on the modifiable risk factors of high blood pressure (HTN), history of transient ischemic attack (TIA), atrial fibrillation (AF), and diabetes. The incidence of these four modifiable risk factors are all high in the disabled population in general but it is not know if they differ between man and women in this population. This is essential information to have before proceeding with development of targeted health promotion activities to reduce stroke. The purpose of this descriptive study was to compare males and females with a disability on risk factors for stroke. The specific aims were to identify if male and female disabled individuals differed in their mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure; or in self reported rates of TIA, atrial fibrillation, or diabetes. Data were collected on the four modifiable risk factors at a variety of conferences and meetings targeted for disabled individuals. Results of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) used to compare the mean diastolic and systolic BPs of the disabled men and women and the chi-square was used to test for differences in the self-reported rates of AF, TIA, and diabetes will be presented. This study has important implications for increasing the proportion of persons appropriately counseled about stroke risks. The identification of differences between disabled men and women's stroke risk factors can be used to develop appropriate health promotion interventions to decrease stroke in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of stroke risk factors in men and women with disabilitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHinkle, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rosalinden_US
dc.contributor.authorRevere, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsJanice Hinkle, Assistant Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: janice.hinkle@villanova.edu; Rosalind Smith; Karen Revereen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163636-
dc.description.abstractEarly recognition and treatment for stroke uses health promotion efforts that focus on the modifiable risk factors of high blood pressure (HTN), history of transient ischemic attack (TIA), atrial fibrillation (AF), and diabetes. The incidence of these four modifiable risk factors are all high in the disabled population in general but it is not know if they differ between man and women in this population. This is essential information to have before proceeding with development of targeted health promotion activities to reduce stroke. The purpose of this descriptive study was to compare males and females with a disability on risk factors for stroke. The specific aims were to identify if male and female disabled individuals differed in their mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure; or in self reported rates of TIA, atrial fibrillation, or diabetes. Data were collected on the four modifiable risk factors at a variety of conferences and meetings targeted for disabled individuals. Results of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) used to compare the mean diastolic and systolic BPs of the disabled men and women and the chi-square was used to test for differences in the self-reported rates of AF, TIA, and diabetes will be presented. This study has important implications for increasing the proportion of persons appropriately counseled about stroke risks. The identification of differences between disabled men and women's stroke risk factors can be used to develop appropriate health promotion interventions to decrease stroke in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:05Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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