Caregivers' confidence in their ability to prevent home injury to a care-recipient with dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163639
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregivers' confidence in their ability to prevent home injury to a care-recipient with dementia
Author(s):
Horvath, Kathy; Hurley, Ann; Smith, Sally; Gauthier, Mary Anne; Harvey, Rose M.; Duffy, Mary; Cipolloni, P. B.; Trudeau, Scott; Hendricks, Ann
Author Details:
Kathy Horvath, Caregroup Healthcare System, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, email: khorvath@caregroup.harvard.edu; Ann Hurley; Sally Smith; Mary Anne Gauthier; Rose M. Harvey; Mary Duffy; P. B. Cipolloni; Scott Trudeau; Ann Hendricks
Abstract:
Purpose: Describe the phenomena of risky behaviors of care-recipients with dementia in home environments and caregivers' actions to prevent accidents and injuries. Aims: 1) Identify gradations of unsafe - safer home environments for care recipients with dementia. 2) Explore the range of less effective - more effective caregiver behaviors used to manage a dementia care-recipient at home. Framework: Perceived self-efficacy provides the framework for the study (Bandura, 1977, 1982, 1986). The concept is concerned with peoples' beliefs in their abilities to perform in a specific area of behavior. Understanding and explaining perceived self-efficacy requires a thorough analysis of the experience of home caregiving for a care-recipient with dementia, with gradations of task demands needed for successful performance. Methods: Sample - Purposive sample of 17 interdisciplinary professionals who support caregivers living with a person with dementia; Data Collection - Semi-structured interviews to elicit detail about gradations of safety problems in the home and range of caregivers' confidence in managing risky behaviors. Data Analysis - Thematic analysis using low-inference descriptors and verbatim statements; concurrent data collection/analysis to pursue emerging themes; constant comparison of parts and whole of text; member-checking and peer-checking; comparison and integration with extant literature. Results and Conclusions: Periods of time when the care-recipient is home alone present the most risky situation for accidents and injuries. Caregivers take chances and allow gaps in supervision because they don't know about or don't have other options, because they don't recognize the early signs of dementia and/or don't understand the nature of the illness. Caregivers' readiness and effectiveness in making home safety modifications are influenced by family support, resilience to make role changes, alliance with professional caregivers, community services, prior direct or vicarious experience with caregiving, and educational resources. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: As the population ages, the prevalence of dementia also increases. Families often wish to keep the care-recipient in the home environment for as long as possible, and health care systems want to provide care in the least costly setting. In order to prevent increased risk of accident, injury, morbidity and mortality, families need assistance to identify resources to fill "gaps" in supervision, individualized education about dementia and home safety issues, and support to make role changes. Quotes and low-inference descriptors from the thematic analysis will assist with item statements to develop a future instrument to measure caregiver perceived self-efficacy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregivers' confidence in their ability to prevent home injury to a care-recipient with dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorvath, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGauthier, Mary Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Rose M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCipolloni, P. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrudeau, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorHendricks, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Horvath, Caregroup Healthcare System, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, email: khorvath@caregroup.harvard.edu; Ann Hurley; Sally Smith; Mary Anne Gauthier; Rose M. Harvey; Mary Duffy; P. B. Cipolloni; Scott Trudeau; Ann Hendricksen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163639-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Describe the phenomena of risky behaviors of care-recipients with dementia in home environments and caregivers' actions to prevent accidents and injuries. Aims: 1) Identify gradations of unsafe - safer home environments for care recipients with dementia. 2) Explore the range of less effective - more effective caregiver behaviors used to manage a dementia care-recipient at home. Framework: Perceived self-efficacy provides the framework for the study (Bandura, 1977, 1982, 1986). The concept is concerned with peoples' beliefs in their abilities to perform in a specific area of behavior. Understanding and explaining perceived self-efficacy requires a thorough analysis of the experience of home caregiving for a care-recipient with dementia, with gradations of task demands needed for successful performance. Methods: Sample - Purposive sample of 17 interdisciplinary professionals who support caregivers living with a person with dementia; Data Collection - Semi-structured interviews to elicit detail about gradations of safety problems in the home and range of caregivers' confidence in managing risky behaviors. Data Analysis - Thematic analysis using low-inference descriptors and verbatim statements; concurrent data collection/analysis to pursue emerging themes; constant comparison of parts and whole of text; member-checking and peer-checking; comparison and integration with extant literature. Results and Conclusions: Periods of time when the care-recipient is home alone present the most risky situation for accidents and injuries. Caregivers take chances and allow gaps in supervision because they don't know about or don't have other options, because they don't recognize the early signs of dementia and/or don't understand the nature of the illness. Caregivers' readiness and effectiveness in making home safety modifications are influenced by family support, resilience to make role changes, alliance with professional caregivers, community services, prior direct or vicarious experience with caregiving, and educational resources. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: As the population ages, the prevalence of dementia also increases. Families often wish to keep the care-recipient in the home environment for as long as possible, and health care systems want to provide care in the least costly setting. In order to prevent increased risk of accident, injury, morbidity and mortality, families need assistance to identify resources to fill "gaps" in supervision, individualized education about dementia and home safety issues, and support to make role changes. Quotes and low-inference descriptors from the thematic analysis will assist with item statements to develop a future instrument to measure caregiver perceived self-efficacy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:08Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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