2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163640
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safety enhancement to prevent home injury to care-recipients with dementia
Author(s):
Horvath, Kathy; Hurley, Ann; Smith, Sally; Gauthier, Mary Anne; Harvey, Rose M.; Duffy, Mary; Cipolloni, P. B.; Trudeau, Scott; Hendricks, Ann
Author Details:
Kathy Horvath, Caregroup Healthcare System, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, email: khorvath@caregroup.harvard.edu; Ann Hurley; Sally Smith; Mary Anne Gauthier; Rose M. Harvey; Mary Duffy; P. B. Cipolloni; Scott Trudeau; Ann Hendricks
Abstract:
Purpose: Goal is to intervene before an injury by providing an environmentally safe home living situation for the care-recipient and provide the caregiver with the know-how and self-confidence to prevent risky behaviors that lead to injuries. Aims: 1) Identify the environmental dangers for injury risk and accidents in homes. 2) Investigate the range of home environmental modifications to which families agree. Framework: Social cognitive theory provides the framework for the study (Bandura, 1977, 1982, 1986). The theory proposes that the social acquisition of knowledge leads to cognitive processes that influence behavior. A central concept is self efficacy, peoples' beliefs in their abilities to perform in a specific area of behavior. Methods: Sample - Sixty-eight caregiver/care-recipient dyads (p < .05, power .80, moderate effect size .3r) enrolled in an outpatient clinic for progressive dementias; Inclusion criteria include caregiver living with care-recipient and expectation to be at home for 6 months. Data Collection - Home safety assessment and recommendations by nurse researcher and occupational therapist at Time 1 and Time 2 (6 months); Standardized measures of cognitive and functional ability of care-recipient (Time 1 and 2), and demographic variables. Data Analysis - Descriptive statistics for environmental dangers observed in homes, modifications that families made, and barriers to implementing recommended changes; Bivariate correlations and regression models to explore relationships among the variables. Results: Initial home visits indicate that frequent risky behaviors associated with accidents and injuries in the home are wandering, unsupervised use of kitchen or bathroom appliances, and mobility problems that interfere with negotiating steps and stairs. Families quickly implement safety modifications when risky behaviors have already been exhibited. To date, families are most receptive to using slide bolt locks in combination with a motion sensor for exits, two-way carpet tape, non-skid rugs and mats, bright colored tape for steps and stairs and surge protectors in place of extension cords. Grab bars in the bathroom are desirable in all homes but difficult to install if the family has to find a contractor that will do small jobs. Caregivers report that specific information on low-cost items and where they can be purchased is essential. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: While it is not possible to make a home absolutely safe for a person with dementia, a realistic nursing goal is to make the home safer to decrease the frequency and seriousness of accidents and injuries. Most of the items needed to make the home safer are inexpensive and easy to apply, but caregivers are not aware of what products are available or how to use them. Future analysis may identify variables that are associated with care-recipient/caregiver dyads that are most vulnerable for risky behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafety enhancement to prevent home injury to care-recipients with dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorvath, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGauthier, Mary Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Rose M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCipolloni, P. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrudeau, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.authorHendricks, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Horvath, Caregroup Healthcare System, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, email: khorvath@caregroup.harvard.edu; Ann Hurley; Sally Smith; Mary Anne Gauthier; Rose M. Harvey; Mary Duffy; P. B. Cipolloni; Scott Trudeau; Ann Hendricksen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163640-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Goal is to intervene before an injury by providing an environmentally safe home living situation for the care-recipient and provide the caregiver with the know-how and self-confidence to prevent risky behaviors that lead to injuries. Aims: 1) Identify the environmental dangers for injury risk and accidents in homes. 2) Investigate the range of home environmental modifications to which families agree. Framework: Social cognitive theory provides the framework for the study (Bandura, 1977, 1982, 1986). The theory proposes that the social acquisition of knowledge leads to cognitive processes that influence behavior. A central concept is self efficacy, peoples' beliefs in their abilities to perform in a specific area of behavior. Methods: Sample - Sixty-eight caregiver/care-recipient dyads (p < .05, power .80, moderate effect size .3r) enrolled in an outpatient clinic for progressive dementias; Inclusion criteria include caregiver living with care-recipient and expectation to be at home for 6 months. Data Collection - Home safety assessment and recommendations by nurse researcher and occupational therapist at Time 1 and Time 2 (6 months); Standardized measures of cognitive and functional ability of care-recipient (Time 1 and 2), and demographic variables. Data Analysis - Descriptive statistics for environmental dangers observed in homes, modifications that families made, and barriers to implementing recommended changes; Bivariate correlations and regression models to explore relationships among the variables. Results: Initial home visits indicate that frequent risky behaviors associated with accidents and injuries in the home are wandering, unsupervised use of kitchen or bathroom appliances, and mobility problems that interfere with negotiating steps and stairs. Families quickly implement safety modifications when risky behaviors have already been exhibited. To date, families are most receptive to using slide bolt locks in combination with a motion sensor for exits, two-way carpet tape, non-skid rugs and mats, bright colored tape for steps and stairs and surge protectors in place of extension cords. Grab bars in the bathroom are desirable in all homes but difficult to install if the family has to find a contractor that will do small jobs. Caregivers report that specific information on low-cost items and where they can be purchased is essential. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: While it is not possible to make a home absolutely safe for a person with dementia, a realistic nursing goal is to make the home safer to decrease the frequency and seriousness of accidents and injuries. Most of the items needed to make the home safer are inexpensive and easy to apply, but caregivers are not aware of what products are available or how to use them. Future analysis may identify variables that are associated with care-recipient/caregiver dyads that are most vulnerable for risky behaviors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:09Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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