2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163643
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Expectations for care elders' satisfaction and trust in health care providers
Author(s):
Hupcey, Judith; Clark, Mary Beth; Hutcheson, Christina; Thompson, Virginia
Author Details:
Judith Hupcey, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jxh37@psu.edu; Mary Beth Clark; Christina Hutcheson; Virginia Thompson
Abstract:
Introduction: The elderly are one of the fastest growing segments of the population in many parts of the world. Keeping this population healthy would result in a both a better quality of life for the elderly and enormous health care savings for families and health care systems. One aspect of promoting health is having patients' expectations for care met. Meeting expectations has been found to influence the level of satisfaction and degree of trust in health care providers that in turn may influence compliance with treatment plans and follow-up care. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify if community dwelling elders' expectations for care were met by describing factors that influence trust in the health care provider and satisfaction with the health care encounter in a primary care setting. Methods: Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and focus group methodology. A total of eight focus groups of three to seven participants were conducted. The sample included 39 elders recruited from three senior centers and one senior housing complex. The focus groups were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: The elder's expectations for care fell into three categories: a sense of personal touch, technical proficiency, and environmental factors. These categories related to the individual provider and/or the environment associated with the practice where the provider was employed. When the provider and practice setting met the elder's expectations for care, then the elder was satisfied. Trust was more complex, since elders could be satisfied but not trust or trust but not be satisfied. Implications for practice: Elders' expectations for care are fairly basic; they want to be treated as an individual by someone who cares about them and who is technically proficient. Environmental factors may influence satisfaction, but may not be essential if the provider's interpersonal and technical skills meet expectations. Health care providers need to treat their elderly patients with respect and take time to address their concerns. Keeping these community-dwelling elders healthy would benefit both the elder and society as a whole.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExpectations for care elders' satisfaction and trust in health care providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHupcey, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Mary Bethen_US
dc.contributor.authorHutcheson, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Hupcey, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jxh37@psu.edu; Mary Beth Clark; Christina Hutcheson; Virginia Thompsonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163643-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The elderly are one of the fastest growing segments of the population in many parts of the world. Keeping this population healthy would result in a both a better quality of life for the elderly and enormous health care savings for families and health care systems. One aspect of promoting health is having patients' expectations for care met. Meeting expectations has been found to influence the level of satisfaction and degree of trust in health care providers that in turn may influence compliance with treatment plans and follow-up care. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify if community dwelling elders' expectations for care were met by describing factors that influence trust in the health care provider and satisfaction with the health care encounter in a primary care setting. Methods: Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and focus group methodology. A total of eight focus groups of three to seven participants were conducted. The sample included 39 elders recruited from three senior centers and one senior housing complex. The focus groups were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: The elder's expectations for care fell into three categories: a sense of personal touch, technical proficiency, and environmental factors. These categories related to the individual provider and/or the environment associated with the practice where the provider was employed. When the provider and practice setting met the elder's expectations for care, then the elder was satisfied. Trust was more complex, since elders could be satisfied but not trust or trust but not be satisfied. Implications for practice: Elders' expectations for care are fairly basic; they want to be treated as an individual by someone who cares about them and who is technically proficient. Environmental factors may influence satisfaction, but may not be essential if the provider's interpersonal and technical skills meet expectations. Health care providers need to treat their elderly patients with respect and take time to address their concerns. Keeping these community-dwelling elders healthy would benefit both the elder and society as a whole.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:12Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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