2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163645
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of a ginger capsule on nausea and vomiting following chemotherapy
Author(s):
Kanaskie, Mary; Polomano, Rosemary C.; Tringali, Ronald A.
Author Details:
Mary Kanaskie, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mkanaskie@psu.edu; Rosemary C. Polomano; Ronald A. Tringali
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a ginger capsule in reducing the delayed onset of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. Research question/aims: Ginger, a natural product, has demonstrated some efficacy in minimizing nausea from motion sickness and some benefit in managing nausea following abdominal surgery. It was hypothesized that ginger capsules, taken during the week following chemotherapy, would significantly reduce the incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting and improve patient outcomes. Conceptual framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms served as the study's conceptual framework. The Unpleasant Symptoms Model indicates that the perception of unpleasant symptoms is influenced by physiological, psychological and situational factors. Methods: Using double-blind placebo controlled crossover design, the effectiveness of ginger was evaluated in thirteen subjects (mean age 45.9, SD=13.8). The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) was used to identify patients who had experienced nausea or vomiting after their first or second chemotherapy treatment. Subjects were then randomized to receive ginger or placebo for six days with the alternate administered following the next treatment. Subjects maintained a daily diary for dietary intake and antiemetic and other medication use. Outcome measures included the Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE) at baseline and The Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) at baseline, day 3 and day 6 following chemotherapy. Results and Conclusions: The ginger and placebo groups demonstrated the same pattern of scoring. Both groups had baseline scores indicative of little or no nausea and little effect on functional living (Ginger mean=111.5 +/-SD=18.4. Placebo mean=125.6 +/-SD=1.1). At day 3, both the placebo and ginger groups reported similar experiences of nausea and changes in their capacity to function (Ginger mean=71.7 +/-SD=23.4. Placebo mean=64.0 +/-SD37.1). In both groups, improvement was evident by day 6 with scores approaching baseline (Ginger mean=101 +/-SD=22.6. Placebo mean=96.3 +/-SD21.6). There was not a significant difference between groups when t-tests of the paired samples were calculated. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was performed to test the difference in the ranks of scores of the placebo and ginger groups for baseline, day 3 and day 6 following chemotherapy. This also revealed no significant differences between the groups at the assigned intervals. Implications for Nursing Practice: While this study did not show ginger to have a significant treatment effect on post-chemotherapy nausea and vomiting, several important conclusions can be made about the findings that will strengthen future research methodologies. A number of factors, such as treatment-related fatigue, lack of at-home support to continue, and worsening disease may contribute to subjects' inability to complete study requirements.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of a ginger capsule on nausea and vomiting following chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKanaskie, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorPolomano, Rosemary C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTringali, Ronald A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMary Kanaskie, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mkanaskie@psu.edu; Rosemary C. Polomano; Ronald A. Tringalien_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163645-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a ginger capsule in reducing the delayed onset of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. Research question/aims: Ginger, a natural product, has demonstrated some efficacy in minimizing nausea from motion sickness and some benefit in managing nausea following abdominal surgery. It was hypothesized that ginger capsules, taken during the week following chemotherapy, would significantly reduce the incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting and improve patient outcomes. Conceptual framework: The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms served as the study's conceptual framework. The Unpleasant Symptoms Model indicates that the perception of unpleasant symptoms is influenced by physiological, psychological and situational factors. Methods: Using double-blind placebo controlled crossover design, the effectiveness of ginger was evaluated in thirteen subjects (mean age 45.9, SD=13.8). The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) was used to identify patients who had experienced nausea or vomiting after their first or second chemotherapy treatment. Subjects were then randomized to receive ginger or placebo for six days with the alternate administered following the next treatment. Subjects maintained a daily diary for dietary intake and antiemetic and other medication use. Outcome measures included the Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE) at baseline and The Functional Living Index Emesis (FLIE) at baseline, day 3 and day 6 following chemotherapy. Results and Conclusions: The ginger and placebo groups demonstrated the same pattern of scoring. Both groups had baseline scores indicative of little or no nausea and little effect on functional living (Ginger mean=111.5 +/-SD=18.4. Placebo mean=125.6 +/-SD=1.1). At day 3, both the placebo and ginger groups reported similar experiences of nausea and changes in their capacity to function (Ginger mean=71.7 +/-SD=23.4. Placebo mean=64.0 +/-SD37.1). In both groups, improvement was evident by day 6 with scores approaching baseline (Ginger mean=101 +/-SD=22.6. Placebo mean=96.3 +/-SD21.6). There was not a significant difference between groups when t-tests of the paired samples were calculated. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was performed to test the difference in the ranks of scores of the placebo and ginger groups for baseline, day 3 and day 6 following chemotherapy. This also revealed no significant differences between the groups at the assigned intervals. Implications for Nursing Practice: While this study did not show ginger to have a significant treatment effect on post-chemotherapy nausea and vomiting, several important conclusions can be made about the findings that will strengthen future research methodologies. A number of factors, such as treatment-related fatigue, lack of at-home support to continue, and worsening disease may contribute to subjects' inability to complete study requirements.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:15Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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