2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163647
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality nursing care: A concept analysis
Author(s):
Kellogg, Victoria
Author Details:
Victoria Kellogg, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, State College, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vak107@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: With healthcare costs escalating, the nation's population aging, technology increasing, and already limited financial resources dwindling, multiple stakeholders are searching for ways to maintain or enhance quality. Quality nursing care is the cornerstone for providing this care. However, the definition of quality nursing care is elusive. Therefore, the purpose of this concept analysis is to explore the concept of quality nursing care. A concept analysis helps "to clarify overused, vague, concepts... so that everyone who subsequently uses the term will be speaking of the same thing" (Walker & Avant, 1983, p. 27). By analyzing a concept, it "becomes useful and meaningful in the discipline... a critical step in the process of developing knowledge related to concepts of interest in nursing" (Rodgers, 2000, p.80). Specific Aims: The overall intention of this analysis is to provide data, which can be utilized by nursing theorists and researchers, to develop deeper insight into and better means to measure this complex concept. The specific aims are 1.) To clarify the use of the concept, 2.) To identify surrogate terms and related concepts, and 3.) To identify criteria used in defining the concept. Framework: A modified version of Rodgers' evolutionary approach was used to analyze the concept of quality nursing care. Methods: Related literature was searched using the computerized databases of CINAHL, HealthStar, and Dissertation abstracts. The keywords employed in the searches were "quality" and "quality nursing care" for the years 1980-2000. Results and Conclusion: As an overall concept, quality nursing care is complicated, with two parties (nurse and patient) merging to interact within the structure, process, and outcome framework and arriving at a decision concerning quality nursing care that could represent two polar ends of the evaluation spectrum. Further research is needed to identify, explore, and clarify the roles of the two parties. Implications for Nursing: Since the inception of modern nursing, interest was been present to assess, measure, and assure quality nursing care is provided to patients. Nurses are the only healthcare professionals in the acute care setting who care for the patient over the entire 24-hour period. Thus, by improving the quality of nursing care, nursing will better serve patients and itself.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality nursing care: A concept analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKellogg, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsVictoria Kellogg, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, State College, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vak107@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163647-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: With healthcare costs escalating, the nation's population aging, technology increasing, and already limited financial resources dwindling, multiple stakeholders are searching for ways to maintain or enhance quality. Quality nursing care is the cornerstone for providing this care. However, the definition of quality nursing care is elusive. Therefore, the purpose of this concept analysis is to explore the concept of quality nursing care. A concept analysis helps "to clarify overused, vague, concepts... so that everyone who subsequently uses the term will be speaking of the same thing" (Walker & Avant, 1983, p. 27). By analyzing a concept, it "becomes useful and meaningful in the discipline... a critical step in the process of developing knowledge related to concepts of interest in nursing" (Rodgers, 2000, p.80). Specific Aims: The overall intention of this analysis is to provide data, which can be utilized by nursing theorists and researchers, to develop deeper insight into and better means to measure this complex concept. The specific aims are 1.) To clarify the use of the concept, 2.) To identify surrogate terms and related concepts, and 3.) To identify criteria used in defining the concept. Framework: A modified version of Rodgers' evolutionary approach was used to analyze the concept of quality nursing care. Methods: Related literature was searched using the computerized databases of CINAHL, HealthStar, and Dissertation abstracts. The keywords employed in the searches were "quality" and "quality nursing care" for the years 1980-2000. Results and Conclusion: As an overall concept, quality nursing care is complicated, with two parties (nurse and patient) merging to interact within the structure, process, and outcome framework and arriving at a decision concerning quality nursing care that could represent two polar ends of the evaluation spectrum. Further research is needed to identify, explore, and clarify the roles of the two parties. Implications for Nursing: Since the inception of modern nursing, interest was been present to assess, measure, and assure quality nursing care is provided to patients. Nurses are the only healthcare professionals in the acute care setting who care for the patient over the entire 24-hour period. Thus, by improving the quality of nursing care, nursing will better serve patients and itself.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:17Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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