2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163651
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Narrative secrets and the analysis of family data
Author(s):
Knafl, Kathleen; Ayres, Lioness
Author Details:
Kathleen Knafl, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: kathleen.knafl@yale.edu; Lioness Ayres
Abstract:
Family secrets take place within the context of the family emotional and relationship system. Their presence represents intensity and anxiety in the family and limited family relationships. Secrets may include problems over money, sexual or health issues, or any problem that a family member believes will raise anxiety in the family, should it be known. The fact that an issue becomes a secret is evidence of undifferentiation among the members of the family and increased chronic anxiety. Secrets are an attempt to adapt to intense chronic and acute anxiety in the family system and may be seen by family members as a desirable state of affairs. Increased anxiety is related to physical, emotional, and social symptom formation among family members. This presentation will use a family case study to explicate a family emotional and relationship process and the forces that surround the family secrets. A focus on the relationship patterns in the family rather than the subject matter of the secret is important for accurate assessment and intervention (Bowen, 1978). The intent of the presentation is to demonstrate the application of the concepts of Bowen's theory to a family case study, and thus, clarify the emotional and relationship processes in that family and describe the symptom formation related to secrets within the family system. The questions that will be addressed are 1) What in the family emotional and relationship system is creating the need for secrets? 2) What part is each family member playing to induce the feeling intensity that made the secret inevitable, and 3) What can be done about the level of differentiation and level of anxiety in the family? Because Bowen's family systems theory offers an encompassing way of viewing human behavior from a family and natural systems perspective, it is an effective framework to guide nursing toward better understanding of human behavior, symptom formation, and the family.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNarrative secrets and the analysis of family dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorAyres, Lionessen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Knafl, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: kathleen.knafl@yale.edu; Lioness Ayresen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163651-
dc.description.abstractFamily secrets take place within the context of the family emotional and relationship system. Their presence represents intensity and anxiety in the family and limited family relationships. Secrets may include problems over money, sexual or health issues, or any problem that a family member believes will raise anxiety in the family, should it be known. The fact that an issue becomes a secret is evidence of undifferentiation among the members of the family and increased chronic anxiety. Secrets are an attempt to adapt to intense chronic and acute anxiety in the family system and may be seen by family members as a desirable state of affairs. Increased anxiety is related to physical, emotional, and social symptom formation among family members. This presentation will use a family case study to explicate a family emotional and relationship process and the forces that surround the family secrets. A focus on the relationship patterns in the family rather than the subject matter of the secret is important for accurate assessment and intervention (Bowen, 1978). The intent of the presentation is to demonstrate the application of the concepts of Bowen's theory to a family case study, and thus, clarify the emotional and relationship processes in that family and describe the symptom formation related to secrets within the family system. The questions that will be addressed are 1) What in the family emotional and relationship system is creating the need for secrets? 2) What part is each family member playing to induce the feeling intensity that made the secret inevitable, and 3) What can be done about the level of differentiation and level of anxiety in the family? Because Bowen's family systems theory offers an encompassing way of viewing human behavior from a family and natural systems perspective, it is an effective framework to guide nursing toward better understanding of human behavior, symptom formation, and the family.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:21Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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