Effects of health promotion on elderly African American women's breast cancer screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163653
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of health promotion on elderly African American women's breast cancer screening
Author(s):
Kurz, Jane; Kurz, Jane McCausland
Author Details:
Jane Kurz, Temple University, Department of Nursing, Newark , Delaware, USA, email: jkurz@temple.edu; Jane McCausland Kurz
Abstract:
Purpose: To measure the effects of the one-year health promotion program on breast cancer screening practices of women at five urban, senior centers in an underserved area. The specific aims of this study were to measure changes in women participating in screening activities (breast self-exams (BSE) and yearly mammograms), to discern why women would decline to engage in breast cancer screening and to assess their fear of cancer. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer increases with age. African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer than any other group. The Health Belief Model provided the framework for the program and evaluation. If women believed they were at high risk for breast cancer and they had the ability to find the treatable cancer, they would engage in screening activities. Method: The investigator directed a one-year health promotion program that used diverse activities bi-monthly to present information about cancer in general, nutrition, co-morbid factors, stress and appropriate screening techniques. Sessions included formal presentations, plays, games, newsletters, pamphlets, exercises, dance, interactive discussions, practice models, exams with Nurse Practitioners, and routine healthful snacks. There was a focus on improving quality, not quantity, of life. Breast cancer screening practices were measured with a pre-test immediately prior to the formal breast cancer presentation. Outcomes were measured with focus group interviews, a visual analog scale (VAS), and a written survey at the end of the program. Results & Conclusions: One hundred and two women between 50 and 99 years of age completed a written survey. Forty-four percent were between 70 and 79 year and 45% had monthly household incomes of less than $625. Many had less than an eighth grade education level. Most had not completed high school. Of these, 16 participated in focus groups and completed a visual analog. During the pre-test 10% of the participants stated that they practiced BSE and 85% had a mammogram in the last year. At the end of the year survey 64% reported practicing BSE and 88% had a mammogram in the last 12 months. Of those who said that they did not practice BSE in the last 6 months, 46% said they planned to do SBE during the next 3 months. Participants cited many reasons for declining a yearly mammogram, e.g., not recognizing risk, no physician support and laziness. When asked why women don't practice BSE, focus group participants suggested a lack of understanding of techniques, fear of finding something, and a feeling that "touching themselves" was wrong. More than 50% of focus group participants reported verbally and on the VAS a reduction in their fear of cancer. Twenty-five per cent reported a slight increase in their fear of cancer. There was a weak correlation between a fear of cancer and BSE practice. The fear of cancer can be reduced and a willingness to engage in cancer screening can be increased in groups that historically have demonstrated low screening rates and high mortality rates for breast cancer. Implications for nursing practice: Information should be repeated over several months using a variety of strategies. Nurses should routinely offer to validate BSE techniques and findings with individuals. Further research is needed to explore the role of fear and cancer screening.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of health promotion on elderly African American women's breast cancer screeningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Janeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Jane McCauslanden_US
dc.author.detailsJane Kurz, Temple University, Department of Nursing, Newark , Delaware, USA, email: jkurz@temple.edu; Jane McCausland Kurzen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163653-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To measure the effects of the one-year health promotion program on breast cancer screening practices of women at five urban, senior centers in an underserved area. The specific aims of this study were to measure changes in women participating in screening activities (breast self-exams (BSE) and yearly mammograms), to discern why women would decline to engage in breast cancer screening and to assess their fear of cancer. The incidence and mortality of breast cancer increases with age. African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer than any other group. The Health Belief Model provided the framework for the program and evaluation. If women believed they were at high risk for breast cancer and they had the ability to find the treatable cancer, they would engage in screening activities. Method: The investigator directed a one-year health promotion program that used diverse activities bi-monthly to present information about cancer in general, nutrition, co-morbid factors, stress and appropriate screening techniques. Sessions included formal presentations, plays, games, newsletters, pamphlets, exercises, dance, interactive discussions, practice models, exams with Nurse Practitioners, and routine healthful snacks. There was a focus on improving quality, not quantity, of life. Breast cancer screening practices were measured with a pre-test immediately prior to the formal breast cancer presentation. Outcomes were measured with focus group interviews, a visual analog scale (VAS), and a written survey at the end of the program. Results & Conclusions: One hundred and two women between 50 and 99 years of age completed a written survey. Forty-four percent were between 70 and 79 year and 45% had monthly household incomes of less than $625. Many had less than an eighth grade education level. Most had not completed high school. Of these, 16 participated in focus groups and completed a visual analog. During the pre-test 10% of the participants stated that they practiced BSE and 85% had a mammogram in the last year. At the end of the year survey 64% reported practicing BSE and 88% had a mammogram in the last 12 months. Of those who said that they did not practice BSE in the last 6 months, 46% said they planned to do SBE during the next 3 months. Participants cited many reasons for declining a yearly mammogram, e.g., not recognizing risk, no physician support and laziness. When asked why women don't practice BSE, focus group participants suggested a lack of understanding of techniques, fear of finding something, and a feeling that "touching themselves" was wrong. More than 50% of focus group participants reported verbally and on the VAS a reduction in their fear of cancer. Twenty-five per cent reported a slight increase in their fear of cancer. There was a weak correlation between a fear of cancer and BSE practice. The fear of cancer can be reduced and a willingness to engage in cancer screening can be increased in groups that historically have demonstrated low screening rates and high mortality rates for breast cancer. Implications for nursing practice: Information should be repeated over several months using a variety of strategies. Nurses should routinely offer to validate BSE techniques and findings with individuals. Further research is needed to explore the role of fear and cancer screening.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:24Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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