Culturally sensitive translation in cross-cultural research: Testing the theory of decentering on the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163656
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culturally sensitive translation in cross-cultural research: Testing the theory of decentering on the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale
Author(s):
Lange, Jean
Author Details:
Jean Lange, Fairfield University, School of Nursing, Woodbridge, Connecticut, USA, email: jlange@mail.fairfield.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine whether the translation technique of decentering produces a more equivalent English version to a Spanish translation of the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale than the original English version. Research Question: Is equivalence of Spanish and English versions improved using decentered versus original item wording? Framework: Instruments developed in one language may not produce an equivalent meaning when translated into another language because of linguistic, cultural, and conceptual differences. A technique known as decentering, in which the original item wording is changed to the back translated version, is an accepted technique to address these differences (Brislin,1970; Jones & Kay, 1992). Proponents suggest that such rewording of original items often produces more equivalent and culturally sensitive instruments (Marin & Marin, 1991). Methods: The 15-item English version of the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale, revised by Munro, Jacobsen, and Brooten (1995), was translated by two different bilingual individuals into Spanish and then back translated into English (a = .90, .95). Seven experts compared the original English items to the back translated English items to judge whether the two versions were conceptually equivalent. Six items were not rated to be equivalent, but judges felt that the decentered wording of these 6 items was less ambiguous than the original wording. These 6 back translated items were therefore added to the original 15 English items, so that scores for 2 English versions (the original instrument as well as a second version substituting the 6 decentered items) could be retrieved. Thirteen bilingual, adult patients completed the 15-item Spanish and 21-item English versions. Correlations among Spanish, original English, and decentered English versions were calculated. Results and Conclusions: Although not statistically significant, correlations of the Spanish translation were improved with the original English version (r=.79), over scores on the decentered English version substituting the 6 back translated items (r=.77). This was contrary to what was expected. As anticipated, decentered and original English versions were highly correlated (r=.90). Implications: Although it is important in cross-cultural research to consider whether the original items in an instrument convey a message that is conceptually equivalent to a translated version of that instrument, investigators should be cautious about using decentering techniques without comparison of decentered versions to the original version. The assumption that decentering procedures will produce more linguistically equivalent versions should be tested by retaining both original and decentered items, enabling comparisons with the translation to be made.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulturally sensitive translation in cross-cultural research: Testing the theory of decentering on the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLange, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Lange, Fairfield University, School of Nursing, Woodbridge, Connecticut, USA, email: jlange@mail.fairfield.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163656-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine whether the translation technique of decentering produces a more equivalent English version to a Spanish translation of the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale than the original English version. Research Question: Is equivalence of Spanish and English versions improved using decentered versus original item wording? Framework: Instruments developed in one language may not produce an equivalent meaning when translated into another language because of linguistic, cultural, and conceptual differences. A technique known as decentering, in which the original item wording is changed to the back translated version, is an accepted technique to address these differences (Brislin,1970; Jones & Kay, 1992). Proponents suggest that such rewording of original items often produces more equivalent and culturally sensitive instruments (Marin & Marin, 1991). Methods: The 15-item English version of the LaMonica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale, revised by Munro, Jacobsen, and Brooten (1995), was translated by two different bilingual individuals into Spanish and then back translated into English (a = .90, .95). Seven experts compared the original English items to the back translated English items to judge whether the two versions were conceptually equivalent. Six items were not rated to be equivalent, but judges felt that the decentered wording of these 6 items was less ambiguous than the original wording. These 6 back translated items were therefore added to the original 15 English items, so that scores for 2 English versions (the original instrument as well as a second version substituting the 6 decentered items) could be retrieved. Thirteen bilingual, adult patients completed the 15-item Spanish and 21-item English versions. Correlations among Spanish, original English, and decentered English versions were calculated. Results and Conclusions: Although not statistically significant, correlations of the Spanish translation were improved with the original English version (r=.79), over scores on the decentered English version substituting the 6 back translated items (r=.77). This was contrary to what was expected. As anticipated, decentered and original English versions were highly correlated (r=.90). Implications: Although it is important in cross-cultural research to consider whether the original items in an instrument convey a message that is conceptually equivalent to a translated version of that instrument, investigators should be cautious about using decentering techniques without comparison of decentered versions to the original version. The assumption that decentering procedures will produce more linguistically equivalent versions should be tested by retaining both original and decentered items, enabling comparisons with the translation to be made.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:27Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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