Mothers and fathers of children with Asperger's Syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders: Differences in stress and coping

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163659
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mothers and fathers of children with Asperger's Syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders: Differences in stress and coping
Author(s):
Little, Liza
Author Details:
Liza Little, Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire, Department of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study examined paired responses of 103 mothers and fathers of children with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and nonverbal learning disorders (NLD). Rates of maternal and paternal stress, and coping, and help seeking measures, within the couple and between mothers and fathers, as a group, were compared. Framework: Family violence research has pointed out that stress in parents has been correlated with abuse potential. Disability studies demonstrate that disabled children are twice as likely to be victimized in their homes than non-disabled children are and that mothers of disabled children are more stressed, depressed, and cope less effectively than their spouses, and that family cohesion is important to positive family outcomes. Nurses are key professionals who influence and care for families of children with disabilities. Design and Sample: This project was part of a larger study that examined the experiences of parents who are raising a child with AS or NLD. In the larger study participants were obtained by placing an invitation on two web sites on the Internet, one for parents of children with Asperger's and one for parents of children with nonverbal learning disorders. Names were collected for three months and all interested parents who e-mailed their mail address were sent two, anonymous surveys (one for each parent). The effective return rate for the larger study (n=508) was 70%. Among the total return there were 103 matched couples. Repeated measures analyses of variance were performed on the paired data to examine the differences between a mother's and father's responses on specific scales of stress, coping, taking anti-depressants for depression and getting professional help. Repeated measures analyses determine whether, on an average, mothers in two parent families are more stressed, getting professional help, or find various coping strategies helpful with their disabled child than the fathers in these two parent families. Findings and Conclusion: Responses indicated that mothers had higher rates of stress related to family problems and pessimism about their child's future, higher rates of antidepressant use, and higher rates of therapy use, and mothers found certain types of coping strategies more helpful than fathers did. Maternal education and child's age were also related to some stress and coping variables. A key role for family nurses is to assess and respond to the overall adaptation of families of children with disabilities by understanding and relating to each parent's reactions and experiences. These findings suggest that when children with AS and NLD are first diagnosed, it would be helpful if nurses assessed the current stress levels and signs of depression in the caregiver. Addressing stresses related to caring for a child with NLD or AS, and focusing on the family as a system would be valuable. Implications for family nursing intervention and future research are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMothers and fathers of children with Asperger's Syndrome and nonverbal learning disorders: Differences in stress and copingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Lizaen_US
dc.author.detailsLiza Little, Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire, Department of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163659-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined paired responses of 103 mothers and fathers of children with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and nonverbal learning disorders (NLD). Rates of maternal and paternal stress, and coping, and help seeking measures, within the couple and between mothers and fathers, as a group, were compared. Framework: Family violence research has pointed out that stress in parents has been correlated with abuse potential. Disability studies demonstrate that disabled children are twice as likely to be victimized in their homes than non-disabled children are and that mothers of disabled children are more stressed, depressed, and cope less effectively than their spouses, and that family cohesion is important to positive family outcomes. Nurses are key professionals who influence and care for families of children with disabilities. Design and Sample: This project was part of a larger study that examined the experiences of parents who are raising a child with AS or NLD. In the larger study participants were obtained by placing an invitation on two web sites on the Internet, one for parents of children with Asperger's and one for parents of children with nonverbal learning disorders. Names were collected for three months and all interested parents who e-mailed their mail address were sent two, anonymous surveys (one for each parent). The effective return rate for the larger study (n=508) was 70%. Among the total return there were 103 matched couples. Repeated measures analyses of variance were performed on the paired data to examine the differences between a mother's and father's responses on specific scales of stress, coping, taking anti-depressants for depression and getting professional help. Repeated measures analyses determine whether, on an average, mothers in two parent families are more stressed, getting professional help, or find various coping strategies helpful with their disabled child than the fathers in these two parent families. Findings and Conclusion: Responses indicated that mothers had higher rates of stress related to family problems and pessimism about their child's future, higher rates of antidepressant use, and higher rates of therapy use, and mothers found certain types of coping strategies more helpful than fathers did. Maternal education and child's age were also related to some stress and coping variables. A key role for family nurses is to assess and respond to the overall adaptation of families of children with disabilities by understanding and relating to each parent's reactions and experiences. These findings suggest that when children with AS and NLD are first diagnosed, it would be helpful if nurses assessed the current stress levels and signs of depression in the caregiver. Addressing stresses related to caring for a child with NLD or AS, and focusing on the family as a system would be valuable. Implications for family nursing intervention and future research are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:30Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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