HIV risk reduction behaviors in adolescent females; The influence of mastery and self-esteem

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163661
Category:
Full-text
Type:
Poster
Level of Evidence:
Cross-Sectional Study
Research Approach:
Quantitative Research
Title:
HIV risk reduction behaviors in adolescent females; The influence of mastery and self-esteem
Author(s):
Long-Middleton, Ellen
Author Details:
Ellen Long-Middleton, Clinical Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Grand Isle, Vermont, USA, email: elongmiddleton@mghihp.edu
Abstract:
Purpose. The purpose of the study was to test the moderator effect of mastery on the relationship between self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors. Aims. The aims of this study were to: 1) examine the relationships among mastery, self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors in a culturally-diverse group of adolescent females, and 2) determine if differences exist in relationships among mastery, self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors among three cultural groups. Framework. AIDS is a leading cause of death in adolescent and young adult populations. Heterosexual transmission of HIV is the fastest growing mode of infection among women, and minority populations are affected disproportionately. It is important to identify and assess psychological determinants of HIV risk reduction behaviors, in order that health care interventions may be tailored to maximize a client's preventive efforts. The psychological characteristics of self-esteem and mastery were examined in this study. Mastery, a global sense of control over one's life, and self-esteem, the value placed on oneself, work together to provide formidable barriers to the stressful consequences of social strain. It was theorized that mastery would potentate self-esteem, and would moderate the influence of self-esteem on HIV risk reduction behaviors through the strengthening of this relationship. Methods. An urban primary care setting in a tertiary care center served as the site for this study, in which a cross-sectional, correlational design was used. The sample consisted of 224 adolescent females 15-19 years of age. Of the 224 participants, 109 identified themselves as black, 58 as Latina, and 57 as white. Participants completed the Pearlin Mastery Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Metzger High Risk Sexual Relationships Subscale of the Adolescent Problem Severity Index, and a demographic data form. All scales had demonstrated psychometric evidence. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test the research hypotheses. Results & Conclusions. No moderator effect of mastery on self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors was found. Mastery and self-esteem did not predict HIV risk reduction behaviors in the total sample or in the cultural subgroups. Age was inversely related to HIV risk reduction behaviors in the total sample and in the black group of participants; household income was positively associated with HIV risk reduction behaviors in only the black group. Age and number of hours worked were inversely related to HIV risk reduction behaviors in white adolescent females who had jobs. Despite non-significant moderation relationships, there is enhanced understanding of what did not provide explanatory value. Implications for Nursing Practice & Knowledge Development in Nursing. Further study is needed to determine significant predictors of HIV risk reduction behaviors in these cultural groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryFull-texten_US
dc.typePosteren_GB
dc.evidence.levelCross-Sectional Studyen
dc.research.approachQuantitative Researchen
dc.titleHIV risk reduction behaviors in adolescent females; The influence of mastery and self-esteemen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLong-Middleton, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Long-Middleton, Clinical Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Grand Isle, Vermont, USA, email: elongmiddleton@mghihp.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163661-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. The purpose of the study was to test the moderator effect of mastery on the relationship between self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors. Aims. The aims of this study were to: 1) examine the relationships among mastery, self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors in a culturally-diverse group of adolescent females, and 2) determine if differences exist in relationships among mastery, self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors among three cultural groups. Framework. AIDS is a leading cause of death in adolescent and young adult populations. Heterosexual transmission of HIV is the fastest growing mode of infection among women, and minority populations are affected disproportionately. It is important to identify and assess psychological determinants of HIV risk reduction behaviors, in order that health care interventions may be tailored to maximize a client's preventive efforts. The psychological characteristics of self-esteem and mastery were examined in this study. Mastery, a global sense of control over one's life, and self-esteem, the value placed on oneself, work together to provide formidable barriers to the stressful consequences of social strain. It was theorized that mastery would potentate self-esteem, and would moderate the influence of self-esteem on HIV risk reduction behaviors through the strengthening of this relationship. Methods. An urban primary care setting in a tertiary care center served as the site for this study, in which a cross-sectional, correlational design was used. The sample consisted of 224 adolescent females 15-19 years of age. Of the 224 participants, 109 identified themselves as black, 58 as Latina, and 57 as white. Participants completed the Pearlin Mastery Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Metzger High Risk Sexual Relationships Subscale of the Adolescent Problem Severity Index, and a demographic data form. All scales had demonstrated psychometric evidence. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to test the research hypotheses. Results & Conclusions. No moderator effect of mastery on self-esteem and HIV risk reduction behaviors was found. Mastery and self-esteem did not predict HIV risk reduction behaviors in the total sample or in the cultural subgroups. Age was inversely related to HIV risk reduction behaviors in the total sample and in the black group of participants; household income was positively associated with HIV risk reduction behaviors in only the black group. Age and number of hours worked were inversely related to HIV risk reduction behaviors in white adolescent females who had jobs. Despite non-significant moderation relationships, there is enhanced understanding of what did not provide explanatory value. Implications for Nursing Practice & Knowledge Development in Nursing. Further study is needed to determine significant predictors of HIV risk reduction behaviors in these cultural groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:33Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
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