2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163666
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The impact of a needleless intravenous system on reported needlesticks
Author(s):
Maguire, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Maguire, Clinical Compliance Consultant, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Hingham, Massachusetts, USA, email: dmaguire@partners.org
Abstract:
A nurse has an occupational exposure risk of approximately 0.3% (1 in 325 exposures) for the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after a percutaneous injury with infected blood (McClinsey, 1999). The conversion to a needleless intravenous delivery system (NIVS) is intended to decrease the risk of blood-borne pathogen exposure. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of a swabbable NIVS on reported needlestick injuries. A study of all reported needlestick injuries occurring between 01/01/00 and 12/31/01 at a large teaching hospital are eligible for retrospective review using data entered into the Epi Info database. A preliminary comparison was made of needlesticks reported before (10 mos. pre) with needlesticks reported after (5 mos. post) the implementation of a NIVS. Exposures had mean decrease per month from 13.1(+/-5) 10 mos. pre to 10.8(+/-2) 5 mos. post. Review of a subgroup of data, clinical practice when sustaining the needlestick, found a decrease in IV related needlesticks in the 5 mos. post group (1.0 post vs. 1.9 pre). Nurses had the largest number of needlesticks of all HCW's (41%) followed by house staff MD's (32%), indicating groups to be targeted for future educational intervention. A 25% increase in employees starting medications with in 1-2 hours in the 5 mos. post group was an unexpected finding. Further research is needed of remaining data set to look at matched months (January-October 2000 versus January-October 2001) of needlestick injuries.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe impact of a needleless intravenous system on reported needlesticksen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Maguire, Clinical Compliance Consultant, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Hingham, Massachusetts, USA, email: dmaguire@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163666-
dc.description.abstractA nurse has an occupational exposure risk of approximately 0.3% (1 in 325 exposures) for the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after a percutaneous injury with infected blood (McClinsey, 1999). The conversion to a needleless intravenous delivery system (NIVS) is intended to decrease the risk of blood-borne pathogen exposure. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of a swabbable NIVS on reported needlestick injuries. A study of all reported needlestick injuries occurring between 01/01/00 and 12/31/01 at a large teaching hospital are eligible for retrospective review using data entered into the Epi Info database. A preliminary comparison was made of needlesticks reported before (10 mos. pre) with needlesticks reported after (5 mos. post) the implementation of a NIVS. Exposures had mean decrease per month from 13.1(+/-5) 10 mos. pre to 10.8(+/-2) 5 mos. post. Review of a subgroup of data, clinical practice when sustaining the needlestick, found a decrease in IV related needlesticks in the 5 mos. post group (1.0 post vs. 1.9 pre). Nurses had the largest number of needlesticks of all HCW's (41%) followed by house staff MD's (32%), indicating groups to be targeted for future educational intervention. A 25% increase in employees starting medications with in 1-2 hours in the 5 mos. post group was an unexpected finding. Further research is needed of remaining data set to look at matched months (January-October 2000 versus January-October 2001) of needlestick injuries.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:38Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.