2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163669
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Knowledge: The key to fall prevention
Author(s):
Matula, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Matula, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: patricia.matula@lvh.com
Abstract:
Patient falls are the largest category of reported incidents in acute patient care. Patient falls increase length of stay and resource utilization. More importantly, they result in pain, serious injury and sometimes even death, particularly in the elderly. The goal of the interdisciplinary Fall Team was to decrease the number and severity of falls throughout the Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN). An extensive review of current literature revealed published fall assessment scales with low sensitivity and specificity. Few patients were excluded in the assessments from being "at risk." To corroborate this finding, we utilized university affiliated nursing students completing a research practicum to complete our existing fall assessment tool on a sample of (N=50) randomly selected patients. Indeed, 95% of the patients were determined to be at high risk for falls. Based on the literature which postulated that caregivers exert influence on patient outcomes through control of environment, risk assessment and implementation of evidence-based interventions, our Fall Team decided to plan and coordinate an institutional wide Fall Prevention Program, aimed at ALL patients. This was a different philosophy than our former approach, which focused on preventing falls in patients assessed to be at high risk. Our root cause analysis showed that many of our most serious falls occurred in patients not considered to be at high risk. The purpose of this project was and continues to be to determine the effect of the Fall Prevention Program on the rate and severity of patient falls. Multiple strategies were initiated. A contest was conducted among all LVHHN staff to select the program's slogan. Prizes were awarded and the activity set the stage for the first step of the program -- AWARENESS. The next step involved the requirement that all employees complete an intranet educational program; the program included a baseline, pre-education fall knowledge assessment. Another strategy involved the pilot units appointing Fall Coordinators to evaluate intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors at predetermined intervals and report the findings to their unit colleagues. Still another strategy was that all falls which occurred on a given unit were subjected to an intense root cause analysis (utilizing a specific format) and action plans developed and implemented based upon each definitive root cause. Preliminary outcome analysis for pilot units reveals an inverse relationship between incidence and severity of inpatient falls to caregiver knowledge. This presentation will highlight the process for using evidence to design a Fall Prevention program, the barriers encountered, lessons learned and results associated with the program. Handouts will include intrinsic and extrinsic risk assessment tools and copies of the evidence table used to design the program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKnowledge: The key to fall preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatula, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Matula, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: patricia.matula@lvh.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163669-
dc.description.abstractPatient falls are the largest category of reported incidents in acute patient care. Patient falls increase length of stay and resource utilization. More importantly, they result in pain, serious injury and sometimes even death, particularly in the elderly. The goal of the interdisciplinary Fall Team was to decrease the number and severity of falls throughout the Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN). An extensive review of current literature revealed published fall assessment scales with low sensitivity and specificity. Few patients were excluded in the assessments from being "at risk." To corroborate this finding, we utilized university affiliated nursing students completing a research practicum to complete our existing fall assessment tool on a sample of (N=50) randomly selected patients. Indeed, 95% of the patients were determined to be at high risk for falls. Based on the literature which postulated that caregivers exert influence on patient outcomes through control of environment, risk assessment and implementation of evidence-based interventions, our Fall Team decided to plan and coordinate an institutional wide Fall Prevention Program, aimed at ALL patients. This was a different philosophy than our former approach, which focused on preventing falls in patients assessed to be at high risk. Our root cause analysis showed that many of our most serious falls occurred in patients not considered to be at high risk. The purpose of this project was and continues to be to determine the effect of the Fall Prevention Program on the rate and severity of patient falls. Multiple strategies were initiated. A contest was conducted among all LVHHN staff to select the program's slogan. Prizes were awarded and the activity set the stage for the first step of the program -- AWARENESS. The next step involved the requirement that all employees complete an intranet educational program; the program included a baseline, pre-education fall knowledge assessment. Another strategy involved the pilot units appointing Fall Coordinators to evaluate intrinsic and extrinsic fall risk factors at predetermined intervals and report the findings to their unit colleagues. Still another strategy was that all falls which occurred on a given unit were subjected to an intense root cause analysis (utilizing a specific format) and action plans developed and implemented based upon each definitive root cause. Preliminary outcome analysis for pilot units reveals an inverse relationship between incidence and severity of inpatient falls to caregiver knowledge. This presentation will highlight the process for using evidence to design a Fall Prevention program, the barriers encountered, lessons learned and results associated with the program. Handouts will include intrinsic and extrinsic risk assessment tools and copies of the evidence table used to design the program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:41Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.