2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163672
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Defining the parameters of self determination as a professional practice behavior
Author(s):
McCray, Laurie
Author Details:
Laurie McCray, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the professional nurse in the enhancement and support of self-determination of clients. Within the nursing profession, self determination is viewed as a basic right of nursing care, with the goal of nursing actions being support and enhancement, without coercion, of informed client choice and decision making. Specific Aim: The specific aims were to develop a survey instrument to measure self-determination practice behaviors as well as a developmental model of self determination, then to pilot the instrument through a survey of registered nurses to examine the influence of self determination principles on the medication process in adults with developmental disabilities. Framework: A planned change theory, Bhola's CLER model (1994) provided a contextual framework for consideration of the results in light of state health care systems change in the field of developmental disabilities. Methods: The survey questions were developed from core definitions and questions pertaining to the four critical attributes of self-determination: choice, control, decision making, and action. Surveys were administered to registered nurses who were members of a state nursing organization that specialized in the field of developmental disabilities. Results/Conclusions: In this univariate descriptive design and analysis, only forty percent of the nurses appeared to be generally cognizant of self-determination principles. Data analysis also highlighted areas for tool revision and suggested areas of educational need for nurses. Implications: If nurses are to fulfill their roles as patient advocates and facilitators of self determination, they must understand and incorporate self-determination principles into their practice. The risk of not professionally internalizing these practices for the developmentally disabled population results in marginalization of these clients. Additionally, incorporation of self-determination principles should be the goal for all nurses if they wish to provide quality nursing care and influence the health care system.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefining the parameters of self determination as a professional practice behavioren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCray, Laurieen_US
dc.author.detailsLaurie McCray, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163672-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the professional nurse in the enhancement and support of self-determination of clients. Within the nursing profession, self determination is viewed as a basic right of nursing care, with the goal of nursing actions being support and enhancement, without coercion, of informed client choice and decision making. Specific Aim: The specific aims were to develop a survey instrument to measure self-determination practice behaviors as well as a developmental model of self determination, then to pilot the instrument through a survey of registered nurses to examine the influence of self determination principles on the medication process in adults with developmental disabilities. Framework: A planned change theory, Bhola's CLER model (1994) provided a contextual framework for consideration of the results in light of state health care systems change in the field of developmental disabilities. Methods: The survey questions were developed from core definitions and questions pertaining to the four critical attributes of self-determination: choice, control, decision making, and action. Surveys were administered to registered nurses who were members of a state nursing organization that specialized in the field of developmental disabilities. Results/Conclusions: In this univariate descriptive design and analysis, only forty percent of the nurses appeared to be generally cognizant of self-determination principles. Data analysis also highlighted areas for tool revision and suggested areas of educational need for nurses. Implications: If nurses are to fulfill their roles as patient advocates and facilitators of self determination, they must understand and incorporate self-determination principles into their practice. The risk of not professionally internalizing these practices for the developmentally disabled population results in marginalization of these clients. Additionally, incorporation of self-determination principles should be the goal for all nurses if they wish to provide quality nursing care and influence the health care system.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:45Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.