2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163673
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Postoperative pain communication skills for elders
Author(s):
McDonald, Deborah; Molony, Sheila
Author Details:
Deborah McDonald, Associate Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Bolton, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Sheila Molony
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the effect of a pain communication intervention on elders' ability to communicate their pain and obtain pain relief after surgery. Research Question: Do elders who are taught pain communication skills and basic pain management information experience less postoperative pain than elders taught only pain management information or elders not taught any additional information? Framework: The intervention was based upon Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) that describes specific communication skills helpful in managing a conversation. Methods: A posttest-only experimental design was used to compare three groups: (a) elders receiving standard preoperative teaching, and viewing the pain management film and the pain communication film; (b) elders receiving standard preoperative teaching and viewing the pain management film; and (c) elders receiving only the standard preoperative teaching. The two films were professionally developed for the study, reviewed by an expert, and tested with a focus group of elders prior to use. CAT guided development of the pain communication film. Content for the pain management film was based on prior work by Ferrell, Rhiner & Ferrell (1993). Forty-one elders undergoing a single total knee replacement at two different hospitals were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. All of the elders had attended a preoperative total joint replacement class (standard preoperative teaching) provided by the hospital, as part of their preparation for surgery. Elders in the two film conditions also received a colorful tri-folded handout summarizing the content of the film(s) they viewed. Average daily postoperative pain was measured with the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire on postoperative day 1, and 2, and 1 and 7 days after discharge by a research assistant blind to the condition. Two pain dimensions were measured, pain intensity (100 mm VAS) and sensory dimensions of pain (0 - 33 scale). Results: Significant group differences emerged for the first postoperative day, F(4,76)=2.96, p < .025. Post hoc analysis with the Scheffe' test revealed that elders in the treatment group reported significantly less sensory pain than elders in the control condition with film, M = 3.6 (SD=2.48) and M=8.7 (SD= 7.19), respectively, F(2, 38) = 4.21, p < .023. The VAS pain intensity scores were M=47.0 (SD=29.24), M= 41.1 (SD=23.16) and M = 31.7 (SD= 18.60) for the control no film, control with film and treatment group, respectively. Conclusions and Implications: A significant difference in the sensory dimension of pain emerged between elders in the treatment group and elders in the control condition with film. The pain intensity differences, although not statistically significant, suggest a clinically significant difference between the treatment and control groups, with treatment group elders reporting a pain intensity in the mild range and elders in the two control groups reporting a slightly higher pain intensity in the moderate range. The sensory and pain intensity results together suggest that teaching elders specific pain communication skills along with basic pain information before surgery might result in greater pain relief during the early postoperative period when pain tends to be most intense. Further refinement of the film intervention is needed so that greater pain relief might be obtained beyond the first postoperative day. Nurses can assist elders to use pain communication skills, for example by teaching them to describe the pain sensation in their own words, use a pain intensity rating scale, prioritize the pain topic when pain is a problem, and ask for clarification when they do not understand their pain management. Elders who effectively communicate their pain may be more likely to obtain greater postoperative pain relief.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePostoperative pain communication skills for eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorMolony, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah McDonald, Associate Professor, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Bolton, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Sheila Molonyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163673-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to test the effect of a pain communication intervention on elders' ability to communicate their pain and obtain pain relief after surgery. Research Question: Do elders who are taught pain communication skills and basic pain management information experience less postoperative pain than elders taught only pain management information or elders not taught any additional information? Framework: The intervention was based upon Communication Accommodation Theory (CAT) that describes specific communication skills helpful in managing a conversation. Methods: A posttest-only experimental design was used to compare three groups: (a) elders receiving standard preoperative teaching, and viewing the pain management film and the pain communication film; (b) elders receiving standard preoperative teaching and viewing the pain management film; and (c) elders receiving only the standard preoperative teaching. The two films were professionally developed for the study, reviewed by an expert, and tested with a focus group of elders prior to use. CAT guided development of the pain communication film. Content for the pain management film was based on prior work by Ferrell, Rhiner & Ferrell (1993). Forty-one elders undergoing a single total knee replacement at two different hospitals were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. All of the elders had attended a preoperative total joint replacement class (standard preoperative teaching) provided by the hospital, as part of their preparation for surgery. Elders in the two film conditions also received a colorful tri-folded handout summarizing the content of the film(s) they viewed. Average daily postoperative pain was measured with the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire on postoperative day 1, and 2, and 1 and 7 days after discharge by a research assistant blind to the condition. Two pain dimensions were measured, pain intensity (100 mm VAS) and sensory dimensions of pain (0 - 33 scale). Results: Significant group differences emerged for the first postoperative day, F(4,76)=2.96, p < .025. Post hoc analysis with the Scheffe' test revealed that elders in the treatment group reported significantly less sensory pain than elders in the control condition with film, M = 3.6 (SD=2.48) and M=8.7 (SD= 7.19), respectively, F(2, 38) = 4.21, p < .023. The VAS pain intensity scores were M=47.0 (SD=29.24), M= 41.1 (SD=23.16) and M = 31.7 (SD= 18.60) for the control no film, control with film and treatment group, respectively. Conclusions and Implications: A significant difference in the sensory dimension of pain emerged between elders in the treatment group and elders in the control condition with film. The pain intensity differences, although not statistically significant, suggest a clinically significant difference between the treatment and control groups, with treatment group elders reporting a pain intensity in the mild range and elders in the two control groups reporting a slightly higher pain intensity in the moderate range. The sensory and pain intensity results together suggest that teaching elders specific pain communication skills along with basic pain information before surgery might result in greater pain relief during the early postoperative period when pain tends to be most intense. Further refinement of the film intervention is needed so that greater pain relief might be obtained beyond the first postoperative day. Nurses can assist elders to use pain communication skills, for example by teaching them to describe the pain sensation in their own words, use a pain intensity rating scale, prioritize the pain topic when pain is a problem, and ask for clarification when they do not understand their pain management. Elders who effectively communicate their pain may be more likely to obtain greater postoperative pain relief.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:46Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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