2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163676
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Homeless women and children living in shelters: A meta-synthesis
Author(s):
Meadows, Mikki
Author Details:
Mikki Meadows, Yale University, Hamden, Connecticut, USA, email: mikki.meadows@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Within the past decade, there has been increase in the number of qualitative studies focusing on homeless women with children. The purpose of the current paper is to synthesize the current qualitative literature on homeless women and children living in shelters. Research Questions: After reviewing the literature on homeless women and children, the following research questions were generated: What are the experiences of homeless women living with their children in shelters? What generalizations can be obtained from qualitative studies on homeless women with children living in shelters that would enable nurses and nurse practitioners to provide better care to this population? Method: This meta-synthesis was conducted using the meta-ethnographic approach of Noblit & Hare (1988). This approach involves a systematic comparison of studies in which the studies are translated into one another. The comparison and translation of the studies is accomplished by the following the seven phases: getting started, deciding what is relevant, reading the studies, determining how the studies are related, translating the studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Seventeen qualitative studies on homeless women with children living in shelters were included in this meta-synthesis. One of the studies was from the field of education, three studies were from psychology, seven studies from social work and six from nursing. The seventeen studies were published between 1991 and 1999. The combined sample of participants in these 17 studies included 319 mothers. Results: Six reciprocal translations of homeless mothers caring for their children in shelters emerged: 1) On becoming homeless-mothers described events that precipitated their arrival at the shelters; 2) For the sake of the children - mothers discussed sacrifices made to protect their children; 3) Loss - after losing their homes, mothers told of losing freedom, respect, and parental authority while living at the shelter; 4) Stressed and depressed - feelings of sadness and depression were revealed; 5) Survival strategies-mothers explained how they used prayer and friends to make it through their homeless experiences; 6) Strategies for resolution - obtaining a better education and finding jobs were strategies that mothers used to resolve their homelessness. Implications: The results of the meta-synthesis illustrate the experience of homeless women with children living in shelters. The included studies shed light on the numerous paths that lead to family homelessness and the resultant experiences. The results may be used by the health care workers as a framework for developing intervention strategies directed toward helping mothers find new solutions to dealing with shelter living and innovative ways to resolve their homelessness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHomeless women and children living in shelters: A meta-synthesisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Mikkien_US
dc.author.detailsMikki Meadows, Yale University, Hamden, Connecticut, USA, email: mikki.meadows@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163676-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Within the past decade, there has been increase in the number of qualitative studies focusing on homeless women with children. The purpose of the current paper is to synthesize the current qualitative literature on homeless women and children living in shelters. Research Questions: After reviewing the literature on homeless women and children, the following research questions were generated: What are the experiences of homeless women living with their children in shelters? What generalizations can be obtained from qualitative studies on homeless women with children living in shelters that would enable nurses and nurse practitioners to provide better care to this population? Method: This meta-synthesis was conducted using the meta-ethnographic approach of Noblit & Hare (1988). This approach involves a systematic comparison of studies in which the studies are translated into one another. The comparison and translation of the studies is accomplished by the following the seven phases: getting started, deciding what is relevant, reading the studies, determining how the studies are related, translating the studies into one another, synthesizing translations, and expressing the synthesis. Seventeen qualitative studies on homeless women with children living in shelters were included in this meta-synthesis. One of the studies was from the field of education, three studies were from psychology, seven studies from social work and six from nursing. The seventeen studies were published between 1991 and 1999. The combined sample of participants in these 17 studies included 319 mothers. Results: Six reciprocal translations of homeless mothers caring for their children in shelters emerged: 1) On becoming homeless-mothers described events that precipitated their arrival at the shelters; 2) For the sake of the children - mothers discussed sacrifices made to protect their children; 3) Loss - after losing their homes, mothers told of losing freedom, respect, and parental authority while living at the shelter; 4) Stressed and depressed - feelings of sadness and depression were revealed; 5) Survival strategies-mothers explained how they used prayer and friends to make it through their homeless experiences; 6) Strategies for resolution - obtaining a better education and finding jobs were strategies that mothers used to resolve their homelessness. Implications: The results of the meta-synthesis illustrate the experience of homeless women with children living in shelters. The included studies shed light on the numerous paths that lead to family homelessness and the resultant experiences. The results may be used by the health care workers as a framework for developing intervention strategies directed toward helping mothers find new solutions to dealing with shelter living and innovative ways to resolve their homelessness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:50Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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