2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163681
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An instrument to measure caring environments
Author(s):
Molony, Sheila
Author Details:
Sheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.edu
Abstract:
Introduction: Quality of life (QOL) has been identified as one of the top three priorities in long-term care (LTC) research, and leaders in LTC have called for the promotion of "livable habitats." Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the HOME scale, an instrument to measure QOL in an environmental context, conceptualized by feeling "at home" in a place. Specific Aims: To test (1) internal consistency reliability and (2) concurrent validity of the HOME Scale by comparing it to the Ferrans and Powers quality of Life Index (QOLI) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS). Framework: The items used in the instrument were derived from the Theory of Caring Environments. Caring environments seek out and recognize individual life stories, needs, desires, hopes, abilities and limitations and expend energy to enhance well-being. Caring environments seek to learn what aspects of separation, connection and transaction are meaningful and make a person feel "at-home." Caring environments are "warm" and promote a feeling of belonging. Methods: The HOME scale was administered to a sample of 35 older adults (mean age = 81 years, s.d. = 8.47) living a variety of environments (nursing home, residential care home, senior housing, private homes). Participants over the age of 60 who were free from major depression and cognitive impairment were eligible for the study. After obtaining informed consent and screening for eligibility using the Geriatric Depression Scale (short form) and the Folstein Mini-Mental Status Exam, participants completed three instruments: the HOME scale, the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QOLI) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS). Results and Conclusions: Cronbach's alpha for the HOME scale was 0.96, supporting reliability and suggesting a degree of redundancy amenable to future refinement and a shorter version of the instrument. In support of validity, the HOME scale score was significantly correlated with an item on the QOLI measuring satisfaction with one's home, room or dwelling (r=0.731, p< .001). Construct validity was supported by statistically significant correlations between morale and at-home-ness (r=0.58, p< .001) and between quality of life and at-home-ness (r=0.62, p< .001). The magnitude of these correlations matches theory-based predictions, since quality of life and morale are subjective constructs while "at-home-ness" captures the existential harmony between subjective-objective, person environment "fit." Validity was further supported by the finding of significant group differences in HOME scale scores between residents of private dwellings, congregate dwellings (senior housing and residential care homes) and nursing homes. Nursing home residents had the lowest HOME scale scores, even after using ANCOVA to control for differences in perceived quality of life related to health and function (F=3.43,df=2, p< .05). Implications: The HOME scale is a promising measure for studies of well-being in long-term care environments, including assisted living environments. Future studies using the scale may examine whether caring relationship is more important than other features of the environment in fostering at-home-ness. Resident- centered interventions designed to promote continuity and connection (e.g. reminiscence, meaningful activity therapy) and organization-wide culture change (e.g. the Pioneer-Movement) may be studied using the HOME scale as one fruitful outcome measure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn instrument to measure caring environmentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMolony, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsSheila L. Molony, PhD, RN, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sheila.molony@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163681-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Quality of life (QOL) has been identified as one of the top three priorities in long-term care (LTC) research, and leaders in LTC have called for the promotion of "livable habitats." Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the HOME scale, an instrument to measure QOL in an environmental context, conceptualized by feeling "at home" in a place. Specific Aims: To test (1) internal consistency reliability and (2) concurrent validity of the HOME Scale by comparing it to the Ferrans and Powers quality of Life Index (QOLI) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS). Framework: The items used in the instrument were derived from the Theory of Caring Environments. Caring environments seek out and recognize individual life stories, needs, desires, hopes, abilities and limitations and expend energy to enhance well-being. Caring environments seek to learn what aspects of separation, connection and transaction are meaningful and make a person feel "at-home." Caring environments are "warm" and promote a feeling of belonging. Methods: The HOME scale was administered to a sample of 35 older adults (mean age = 81 years, s.d. = 8.47) living a variety of environments (nursing home, residential care home, senior housing, private homes). Participants over the age of 60 who were free from major depression and cognitive impairment were eligible for the study. After obtaining informed consent and screening for eligibility using the Geriatric Depression Scale (short form) and the Folstein Mini-Mental Status Exam, participants completed three instruments: the HOME scale, the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QOLI) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGMS). Results and Conclusions: Cronbach's alpha for the HOME scale was 0.96, supporting reliability and suggesting a degree of redundancy amenable to future refinement and a shorter version of the instrument. In support of validity, the HOME scale score was significantly correlated with an item on the QOLI measuring satisfaction with one's home, room or dwelling (r=0.731, p< .001). Construct validity was supported by statistically significant correlations between morale and at-home-ness (r=0.58, p< .001) and between quality of life and at-home-ness (r=0.62, p< .001). The magnitude of these correlations matches theory-based predictions, since quality of life and morale are subjective constructs while "at-home-ness" captures the existential harmony between subjective-objective, person environment "fit." Validity was further supported by the finding of significant group differences in HOME scale scores between residents of private dwellings, congregate dwellings (senior housing and residential care homes) and nursing homes. Nursing home residents had the lowest HOME scale scores, even after using ANCOVA to control for differences in perceived quality of life related to health and function (F=3.43,df=2, p< .05). Implications: The HOME scale is a promising measure for studies of well-being in long-term care environments, including assisted living environments. Future studies using the scale may examine whether caring relationship is more important than other features of the environment in fostering at-home-ness. Resident- centered interventions designed to promote continuity and connection (e.g. reminiscence, meaningful activity therapy) and organization-wide culture change (e.g. the Pioneer-Movement) may be studied using the HOME scale as one fruitful outcome measure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:55Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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