2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163682
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the latent and human factors related to safe medication administration
Author(s):
Moody, Joy
Author Details:
Joy Moody, Director of Emergency Nursing at Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA, email: moodyjo@mmc.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors that contributed to adverse drug events in the emergency department and to identify strategies used by these emergency departments to reduce medication errors. Awareness of health care errors has been heightened by the Institute of Medicine's work and media reports of catastrophic events. Confidence in health care professionals is in jeopardy. Professional practice demands accountability. Specific Aims: The specific aims were to develop a survey instrument to examine specific strategies used to reduce medication errors and to devise a model to explain the factors influencing safe practice. The Integrated Error Analysis Model illustrates the interactions of latent factors (the system) and human factors at the interface of the two. Theoretical Framework: Accident causation and human factors Reason (1990), normal accident theory, Perrow (1984) including normalization of deviance (Vaughn (1996) and high reliability theory IOM (2000) served as the basis for both model development and survey tool implementation. Methods: The author developed survey tool was sent to all (N=35) Emergency Department nurse managers in the state of Maine. The tool grouped questions into categories based on the Integrated Error Analysis Model. While it primarily addressed latent systems factors, embedded in most all questions were the human factors related to safe medication administration. Results/Findings: The return rate from emergency department managers was 73%. Of these, it was revealed that 74% of Maine's acute care hospital emergency departments had some level of awareness of adverse drug events and the need for medication reduction strategies as indicated by the implementation of medication safety measures in the past three years. Anecdotally, the scope and type of measures were reported to be related to financial resources and the level of organizational support. One area for concern was that 38% of the emergency departments reported no plans for future efforts in medication reduction. A great deal of opportunity exists for improvement in continued efforts at medication error reduction. Implications: Although there appeared to be a significant level of awareness, education about the integration of theories related to error, awareness of human and latent systems factors and viewing medication errors within a context of quality improvement should be encouraged. Error reduction in medication administration as well as in all procedures and processes is essential to quality health care and professional practice. Health care professionals and organizations must work collaboratively to make safe practice a priority throughout the health care system.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the latent and human factors related to safe medication administrationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Joyen_US
dc.author.detailsJoy Moody, Director of Emergency Nursing at Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA, email: moodyjo@mmc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163682-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore factors that contributed to adverse drug events in the emergency department and to identify strategies used by these emergency departments to reduce medication errors. Awareness of health care errors has been heightened by the Institute of Medicine's work and media reports of catastrophic events. Confidence in health care professionals is in jeopardy. Professional practice demands accountability. Specific Aims: The specific aims were to develop a survey instrument to examine specific strategies used to reduce medication errors and to devise a model to explain the factors influencing safe practice. The Integrated Error Analysis Model illustrates the interactions of latent factors (the system) and human factors at the interface of the two. Theoretical Framework: Accident causation and human factors Reason (1990), normal accident theory, Perrow (1984) including normalization of deviance (Vaughn (1996) and high reliability theory IOM (2000) served as the basis for both model development and survey tool implementation. Methods: The author developed survey tool was sent to all (N=35) Emergency Department nurse managers in the state of Maine. The tool grouped questions into categories based on the Integrated Error Analysis Model. While it primarily addressed latent systems factors, embedded in most all questions were the human factors related to safe medication administration. Results/Findings: The return rate from emergency department managers was 73%. Of these, it was revealed that 74% of Maine's acute care hospital emergency departments had some level of awareness of adverse drug events and the need for medication reduction strategies as indicated by the implementation of medication safety measures in the past three years. Anecdotally, the scope and type of measures were reported to be related to financial resources and the level of organizational support. One area for concern was that 38% of the emergency departments reported no plans for future efforts in medication reduction. A great deal of opportunity exists for improvement in continued efforts at medication error reduction. Implications: Although there appeared to be a significant level of awareness, education about the integration of theories related to error, awareness of human and latent systems factors and viewing medication errors within a context of quality improvement should be encouraged. Error reduction in medication administration as well as in all procedures and processes is essential to quality health care and professional practice. Health care professionals and organizations must work collaboratively to make safe practice a priority throughout the health care system.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:56Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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