2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163684
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Body image in African American women: A critical review of the literature
Author(s):
Morin, Karen; Perry, Shakeitha
Author Details:
Karen Morin, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: khm10@psu.edu; Shakeitha Perry
Abstract:
Problem: As a group, African American women tend to be more satisfied with their body and have less concern about their weight than do other ethnic groups (Greenburg & LaPorte, 1996). However, factors that contribute to these trends remain unclear. Purpose: To evaluate the empirical literature addressing factors influencing body image in African American women. Methods: Articles were drawn from CINAHL and MEDLINE electronic databases. All reports were dated between the years 1985-2000. Key words included image, body image, women of color, body image in women of color, and cross-cultural body image. Key words were searched for in the title and abstract of each article. Articles were selected on the basis of overall relevance to the study and availability. Results: A total of 18 research articles were retrieved and are included in this review. Topics addressed were placed in six categories: ethnicity differences, assimilation, gender preferences, eating behaviors, history of teasing, and se lf-esteem. Conclusion: Ethnicity differences were noted regarding the issue of body satisfaction. The degree to which women identified with the African American culture was influential. African American men were positive about African American women's body size than Caucasian men were about Caucasian women's body. African American women experienced fewer eating disorders. The effects of teasing seem to be consistent, regardless of ethnicity: teasing early in childhood decreases self-esteem and contributes to a negative body image. Self-esteem was high among African American women. There seems to be less pressure on African American women to be thin. The African American woman's self image in not heavily dependent on her body size. Furthermore, the public's perception of her and other aspects of her being may be more important in understanding her body image. This only seems to be relevant to African-American women who identify with the African - American culture and who have not assimilated into the Caucasian culture (Abrams, et al., 1993). Concerns about the research reviewed include: use of convenient samples (typically college students), unreported reliability or limited reliability of instruments used to measure body image, variability in the type of instruments used to measure body, and lack of a comprehensive definition of body image. Implications for Future Research: Nurses can use this information to provide culturally sensitive. Future studies need to consider using a non-college student sample, including women of color who are middle aged and older.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBody image in African American women: A critical review of the literatureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorin, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Shakeithaen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Morin, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: khm10@psu.edu; Shakeitha Perryen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163684-
dc.description.abstractProblem: As a group, African American women tend to be more satisfied with their body and have less concern about their weight than do other ethnic groups (Greenburg & LaPorte, 1996). However, factors that contribute to these trends remain unclear. Purpose: To evaluate the empirical literature addressing factors influencing body image in African American women. Methods: Articles were drawn from CINAHL and MEDLINE electronic databases. All reports were dated between the years 1985-2000. Key words included image, body image, women of color, body image in women of color, and cross-cultural body image. Key words were searched for in the title and abstract of each article. Articles were selected on the basis of overall relevance to the study and availability. Results: A total of 18 research articles were retrieved and are included in this review. Topics addressed were placed in six categories: ethnicity differences, assimilation, gender preferences, eating behaviors, history of teasing, and se lf-esteem. Conclusion: Ethnicity differences were noted regarding the issue of body satisfaction. The degree to which women identified with the African American culture was influential. African American men were positive about African American women's body size than Caucasian men were about Caucasian women's body. African American women experienced fewer eating disorders. The effects of teasing seem to be consistent, regardless of ethnicity: teasing early in childhood decreases self-esteem and contributes to a negative body image. Self-esteem was high among African American women. There seems to be less pressure on African American women to be thin. The African American woman's self image in not heavily dependent on her body size. Furthermore, the public's perception of her and other aspects of her being may be more important in understanding her body image. This only seems to be relevant to African-American women who identify with the African - American culture and who have not assimilated into the Caucasian culture (Abrams, et al., 1993). Concerns about the research reviewed include: use of convenient samples (typically college students), unreported reliability or limited reliability of instruments used to measure body image, variability in the type of instruments used to measure body, and lack of a comprehensive definition of body image. Implications for Future Research: Nurses can use this information to provide culturally sensitive. Future studies need to consider using a non-college student sample, including women of color who are middle aged and older.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:11:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:11:59Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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