Identification and description of changing patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression in the caregiver-patient relationship over time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163691
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identification and description of changing patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression in the caregiver-patient relationship over time
Author(s):
Offner, Judith
Author Details:
Judith Offner, Camden County Health Services Center, Medford, New Jersey, USA, email: joffner@cchsc.com
Abstract:
The purpose of this longitudinal descriptive study was to describe and identify the changing patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility and caregiver depression within the context of Offner's theory of waxing and waning caregiver-patient relationships. Of the 736 caregivers and patients in the original data set, 50 patient caregiver dyads had complete data and were used in the present study. The original sample was obtained from consenting caregivers and patients who were recruited at several urban Michigan hospitals. Patients in the current study were male (54%) or female (46%), married (64%), and widowed (30%). Many (74%) patients and caregivers cohabited. The average age was 78.5 years and ranged from 60-92 years. The majority of caregivers in the current study were female (86%), white (85%), spouses (62%) and daughters (26%). Most caregivers were married (84%) and their average age was 62 with the range from 27 to 92 years. The Patient Cognition Assessment Instrument and the Patient Mobility Assessment Instrument and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies' Depression Scale measured these variables at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after patient hospital discharge. In the current study, Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from .66 to .92. There were nonsignificant changes in patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression scores over time. Further analysis using grouping techniques and hierarchical cluster analysis identified and described a large array of patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression in the dyads over time, and highlighted three persistent prevalent patterns. The 3 most prevalent patterns identified: "Good patient mobility/Average Caregiver depression"; "Average patient cognition/Average caregiver depression"; and "Average patient cognition, Good patient mobility/Average caregiver depression". Also, caregivers experienced symptoms of depression throughout the entire study. This focus on patterns rather than prediction extended caregiver research by taking it in a new direction. Knowledge about prevalent patterns of stress in dyadic caregiver patient relationships may help clinicians predict and explain changes in the caregiver patient relationship over time. Interventions such as anticipatory guidance and education about the changing patterns over time may assist caregivers and patients to negotiate their caregiver-patient relationship through difficult times. Findings highlighted the need for continued refinement of the theoretical conceptualization of the dyadic caregiver-patient relationship and the further exploration of dyadic patterns.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentification and description of changing patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression in the caregiver-patient relationship over timeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOffner, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Offner, Camden County Health Services Center, Medford, New Jersey, USA, email: joffner@cchsc.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163691-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this longitudinal descriptive study was to describe and identify the changing patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility and caregiver depression within the context of Offner's theory of waxing and waning caregiver-patient relationships. Of the 736 caregivers and patients in the original data set, 50 patient caregiver dyads had complete data and were used in the present study. The original sample was obtained from consenting caregivers and patients who were recruited at several urban Michigan hospitals. Patients in the current study were male (54%) or female (46%), married (64%), and widowed (30%). Many (74%) patients and caregivers cohabited. The average age was 78.5 years and ranged from 60-92 years. The majority of caregivers in the current study were female (86%), white (85%), spouses (62%) and daughters (26%). Most caregivers were married (84%) and their average age was 62 with the range from 27 to 92 years. The Patient Cognition Assessment Instrument and the Patient Mobility Assessment Instrument and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies' Depression Scale measured these variables at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after patient hospital discharge. In the current study, Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from .66 to .92. There were nonsignificant changes in patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression scores over time. Further analysis using grouping techniques and hierarchical cluster analysis identified and described a large array of patterns of patient cognition, patient mobility, and caregiver depression in the dyads over time, and highlighted three persistent prevalent patterns. The 3 most prevalent patterns identified: "Good patient mobility/Average Caregiver depression"; "Average patient cognition/Average caregiver depression"; and "Average patient cognition, Good patient mobility/Average caregiver depression". Also, caregivers experienced symptoms of depression throughout the entire study. This focus on patterns rather than prediction extended caregiver research by taking it in a new direction. Knowledge about prevalent patterns of stress in dyadic caregiver patient relationships may help clinicians predict and explain changes in the caregiver patient relationship over time. Interventions such as anticipatory guidance and education about the changing patterns over time may assist caregivers and patients to negotiate their caregiver-patient relationship through difficult times. Findings highlighted the need for continued refinement of the theoretical conceptualization of the dyadic caregiver-patient relationship and the further exploration of dyadic patterns.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:07Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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