Using focus groups to examine women's perception of CHD risk, symptoms, and symptom management in acute myocardial infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163694
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using focus groups to examine women's perception of CHD risk, symptoms, and symptom management in acute myocardial infarction
Author(s):
Parkosewich, Janet; Knafl, Kathleen
Author Details:
Janet Parkosewich, Yale-New Haven Hospital, North Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Parkosewich@ynhh.com; Kathleen Knafl
Abstract:
Background: Attribution of symptoms to myocardial infarction (MI) is more likely to occur if people's expectations of MI symptoms match their experience and if they perceive they are at risk. Expected symptoms and perception of MI risk vary greatly among the general public and these inaccuracies can contribute to delays in seeking lifesaving care. For women, symptom attribution becomes even more confusing due to possible gender differences in symptom presentation. Purpose: To explore the perception and experiences of women with regard to their personal risk for CHD, symptoms associated with acute MI and action plan for management of these presenting symptoms. Specific aim: To compare and contrast the CHD related perceptions and experiences of three different groups of women. Method: A secondary analysis was performed on data from 3 focus groups with women who were at high risk, low risk, or diagnosed with CHD. The sample consisted of 32 women (10 to 12 women per group) aged 39 to 72 years. Participants were white with the exception of two black women in the high risk group. Qualitative methods were used to retrieve, compare and conceptualize data within and across groups. Responses to open-ended questions, probes of the moderator, and participants' comments were systematically reviewed, coded, and analyzed to identify major categories of response. Results: Six categories with respective themes emerged. Categories included personal risk for CHD; defining the symptoms of acute MI; CHD diagnosis experience; symptom response patterns in women without CHD; gender differences in care; and advice from women with CHD. Three themes (divergent viewpoints and actions, time urgency, and lack of physician awareness) consistently permeated the 6 categories. Conclusions: Knowledge of heart disease risk, symptoms of MI, and the ideal action plan (calling 911) did not guarantee women in this study would be motivated to seek care for CHD symptoms. Major barriers to seeking prompt lifesaving care included women's family and social obligations, concerns about the emotional consequences should they inaccurately attribute symptoms to their heart, poor advice from family, friends and physicians, and physicians' lack of awareness of heart disease in women. Implications: Nurses, through public education and practice, can aid in dispelling the myth that heart disease is a man's disease. Nursing research is needed to examine the efficacy of interventions devised to heighten women's awareness of CHD symptoms and decrease delays in seeking care. Interventions must go beyond education and include those that help women overcome maladaptive psychological and emotional responses associated with symptom attribution and care seeking behavior. Interventions need to be tested to assure that women possess assertive communication skills so they may become active participants in their care, capable of demanding and receiving evidenced based cardiovascular care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing focus groups to examine women's perception of CHD risk, symptoms, and symptom management in acute myocardial infarctionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParkosewich, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Parkosewich, Yale-New Haven Hospital, North Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Parkosewich@ynhh.com; Kathleen Knaflen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163694-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Attribution of symptoms to myocardial infarction (MI) is more likely to occur if people's expectations of MI symptoms match their experience and if they perceive they are at risk. Expected symptoms and perception of MI risk vary greatly among the general public and these inaccuracies can contribute to delays in seeking lifesaving care. For women, symptom attribution becomes even more confusing due to possible gender differences in symptom presentation. Purpose: To explore the perception and experiences of women with regard to their personal risk for CHD, symptoms associated with acute MI and action plan for management of these presenting symptoms. Specific aim: To compare and contrast the CHD related perceptions and experiences of three different groups of women. Method: A secondary analysis was performed on data from 3 focus groups with women who were at high risk, low risk, or diagnosed with CHD. The sample consisted of 32 women (10 to 12 women per group) aged 39 to 72 years. Participants were white with the exception of two black women in the high risk group. Qualitative methods were used to retrieve, compare and conceptualize data within and across groups. Responses to open-ended questions, probes of the moderator, and participants' comments were systematically reviewed, coded, and analyzed to identify major categories of response. Results: Six categories with respective themes emerged. Categories included personal risk for CHD; defining the symptoms of acute MI; CHD diagnosis experience; symptom response patterns in women without CHD; gender differences in care; and advice from women with CHD. Three themes (divergent viewpoints and actions, time urgency, and lack of physician awareness) consistently permeated the 6 categories. Conclusions: Knowledge of heart disease risk, symptoms of MI, and the ideal action plan (calling 911) did not guarantee women in this study would be motivated to seek care for CHD symptoms. Major barriers to seeking prompt lifesaving care included women's family and social obligations, concerns about the emotional consequences should they inaccurately attribute symptoms to their heart, poor advice from family, friends and physicians, and physicians' lack of awareness of heart disease in women. Implications: Nurses, through public education and practice, can aid in dispelling the myth that heart disease is a man's disease. Nursing research is needed to examine the efficacy of interventions devised to heighten women's awareness of CHD symptoms and decrease delays in seeking care. Interventions must go beyond education and include those that help women overcome maladaptive psychological and emotional responses associated with symptom attribution and care seeking behavior. Interventions need to be tested to assure that women possess assertive communication skills so they may become active participants in their care, capable of demanding and receiving evidenced based cardiovascular care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:10Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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