2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163695
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital outcomes research: The influence of the nurse practice environment
Author(s):
Patrician, Patricia; Baernholdt, Marianne
Author Details:
Patricia Patrician, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, ppatrici@uab.edu; Marianne Baernholdt
Abstract:
Purpose: One aim of health services research is to determine the reasons for differential patient outcomes (e.g., mortality) as a result of hospital care. Traditionally, structural characteristics have predominated in hospital-level measures that attempt to explain differences in patient outcomes. The contributions of nursing have been considered only tangentially - and only via structural characteristics, such as staffing. While we do not discount the importance of adequate human resources in the production of positive patient outcomes, we propose that how nursing care is organized and supported by hospital administration has effects on patients above and beyond that of staffing. The purpose of this presentation is to examine organizational attributes that support the work of nursing and consequently, that enhance the ability to differentiate hospital effectiveness. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to: 1) Review research on current hospital characteristics that explain differences in patient outcomes. 2) Examine the nursing's contributions to these outcomes. 3) Propose contextual (both structural and process) variables that more directly measures nursing's input on patient outcomes. Framework: The classic Donabedian framework of structure, process, and outcome will guide this presentation. Methods: Electronic literature search on Cinahl, Medline, and Cochrane using keywords: nursing, staffing, outcomes, mortality, hospital organization, organization of nursing care, professional practice, and combinations of these. Key published papers and select health services journals were hand searched. Results: By far, the majority of current health services related research fails to consider nursing's input into the production of hospital level outcomes. Studies that do include nursing often use nurse staffing alone; indeed several papers failed to define the constituency known collectively as "nurse staffing." A small, but promising body of research is examining the work environment of nurses and its contribution to patient outcomes. Organizational attributes related to the nursing practice environment such as the degree of authority nurses excises over patient care, the collaborative relationships they develop with other health care workers, and the degree of administrative support, exert a significant effect on patient outcomes above and beyond hospital structural characteristics. Conclusion: In order to guide policy on improving the quality hospital-based care, the factors responsible for patient outcomes must be fully understood. The contributions of nursing must be recognized; the contextual features of the nursing practice environment must be further developed and explored.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital outcomes research: The influence of the nurse practice environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPatrician, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaernholdt, Marianneen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Patrician, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, ppatrici@uab.edu; Marianne Baernholdten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163695-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: One aim of health services research is to determine the reasons for differential patient outcomes (e.g., mortality) as a result of hospital care. Traditionally, structural characteristics have predominated in hospital-level measures that attempt to explain differences in patient outcomes. The contributions of nursing have been considered only tangentially - and only via structural characteristics, such as staffing. While we do not discount the importance of adequate human resources in the production of positive patient outcomes, we propose that how nursing care is organized and supported by hospital administration has effects on patients above and beyond that of staffing. The purpose of this presentation is to examine organizational attributes that support the work of nursing and consequently, that enhance the ability to differentiate hospital effectiveness. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to: 1) Review research on current hospital characteristics that explain differences in patient outcomes. 2) Examine the nursing's contributions to these outcomes. 3) Propose contextual (both structural and process) variables that more directly measures nursing's input on patient outcomes. Framework: The classic Donabedian framework of structure, process, and outcome will guide this presentation. Methods: Electronic literature search on Cinahl, Medline, and Cochrane using keywords: nursing, staffing, outcomes, mortality, hospital organization, organization of nursing care, professional practice, and combinations of these. Key published papers and select health services journals were hand searched. Results: By far, the majority of current health services related research fails to consider nursing's input into the production of hospital level outcomes. Studies that do include nursing often use nurse staffing alone; indeed several papers failed to define the constituency known collectively as "nurse staffing." A small, but promising body of research is examining the work environment of nurses and its contribution to patient outcomes. Organizational attributes related to the nursing practice environment such as the degree of authority nurses excises over patient care, the collaborative relationships they develop with other health care workers, and the degree of administrative support, exert a significant effect on patient outcomes above and beyond hospital structural characteristics. Conclusion: In order to guide policy on improving the quality hospital-based care, the factors responsible for patient outcomes must be fully understood. The contributions of nursing must be recognized; the contextual features of the nursing practice environment must be further developed and explored.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:11Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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