2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163699
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healing secrets: Family dialogue about the death of a child
Author(s):
Picard, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Picard, Lunenberg, Massachusetts, USA, email: cpicard@partners.org
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of cooperative inquiry into the presenter's own family experience of the death of a child to sudden infant death syndrome. Through this praxis method based on Newman's health as expanding consciousness, family members (n=10) had an opportunity, both individually and together, to explore the impact of this experience on subsequent family life over three generations. Family members met with the presenter individually for dialogue, were given transcripts of all members' dialogues for further reflection. The family then came together for a joint dialogue. Both process and content of the inquiry will illustrate the shared and unique ways in which this loss was both hidden and expressed over time. The secret nature of their grief responses will be presented and implications of this mode of inquiry discussed. Over reading is a technique of narrative analysis that directs research to the secrets of the interview text (Poirier & Ayres, 1997). From the perspective of narrative analysis, secrets are important elements of the respondent's story that are revealed by considering the structure as well as the content of the account. The analysis of narrative secrets includes the search for omissions, incongruities, and repetitions in the text and the use of these structural dimensions to provide a more complete understanding of the respondent's experiences. Application of narrative techniques has been limited to studies in which the individual is the unit of analysis. However, over reading can be a useful strategy for family researchers who are interested in using individual accounts to compare family members' experiences or portray the experience of the family unit as a whole. The intent of this presentation is to demonstrate the use of over reading in the analysis of family data. Using case examples from a study of families in which there was a child with a chronic illness (Knafl, Breitmayer, Gallo, & Zoeller, 1994), distinct family patterns of narrative secrets are described based on an analysis of omissions, incongruities, and repetitions in parent's individual interviews. Over reading and analysis of narrative secrets are discussed in terms of the insights they reveal about the nature of family response to illness and the limitations of interview data.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealing secrets: Family dialogue about the death of a childen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPicard, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Picard, Lunenberg, Massachusetts, USA, email: cpicard@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163699-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to describe a method of cooperative inquiry into the presenter's own family experience of the death of a child to sudden infant death syndrome. Through this praxis method based on Newman's health as expanding consciousness, family members (n=10) had an opportunity, both individually and together, to explore the impact of this experience on subsequent family life over three generations. Family members met with the presenter individually for dialogue, were given transcripts of all members' dialogues for further reflection. The family then came together for a joint dialogue. Both process and content of the inquiry will illustrate the shared and unique ways in which this loss was both hidden and expressed over time. The secret nature of their grief responses will be presented and implications of this mode of inquiry discussed. Over reading is a technique of narrative analysis that directs research to the secrets of the interview text (Poirier & Ayres, 1997). From the perspective of narrative analysis, secrets are important elements of the respondent's story that are revealed by considering the structure as well as the content of the account. The analysis of narrative secrets includes the search for omissions, incongruities, and repetitions in the text and the use of these structural dimensions to provide a more complete understanding of the respondent's experiences. Application of narrative techniques has been limited to studies in which the individual is the unit of analysis. However, over reading can be a useful strategy for family researchers who are interested in using individual accounts to compare family members' experiences or portray the experience of the family unit as a whole. The intent of this presentation is to demonstrate the use of over reading in the analysis of family data. Using case examples from a study of families in which there was a child with a chronic illness (Knafl, Breitmayer, Gallo, & Zoeller, 1994), distinct family patterns of narrative secrets are described based on an analysis of omissions, incongruities, and repetitions in parent's individual interviews. Over reading and analysis of narrative secrets are discussed in terms of the insights they reveal about the nature of family response to illness and the limitations of interview data.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:16Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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