2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163700
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of well-being in chronic illness
Author(s):
Barberio, Judith
Author Details:
Judith Barberio, PhD, APN,C, Lebanon, New Jersey, USA, email: jabphd83@aol.com
Abstract:
Purpose: Forty-Five percent of the U.S. population is diagnosed with a chronic illness. The perception of stress and subsequent illness representation impact the subjective state of an individual's well-being. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) was the prototypic chronic illness under study because it has multifactorial dimensions that involve the psyche and soma. The diagnosis and treatment of CFS effects the physical, psychological, and social self, and impacts the perception of stress and well-being. Hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors were the predictors of well-being under study. These predictors have been identified in the psychology literature as resistance resources that can neutralize the otherwise debilitating effects of stressful life events. Research Questions: This study tested the relationship between well-being and the presence of the resistance resources of hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors, individually and combined, in 102 men and women diagnosed with CFS. Framework: Antonovsky's (1979) research on the effects of stress on the health of an individual and resistance resources that may neutralize the debilitating effects of stressful life events guided this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational design was used to assess hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors individually with well-being and multiple regression analysis was used to assess the combined effect on well-being. Hardiness was measured by the Personal Views Survey (PVS)(50 items, alpha=.85), social support by the Personal Resource Questionnaire, Part II (PRQ85 II)(25 item, alpha=.93), health promoting behaviors by the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II)(52 items, alpha=.92),and well-being by the Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36)(36 item, alpha=.96)in the participant's home. The sample (N=102) which was recruited from medical practices, CFS conferences and newsletters, and the internet were 85% female, 93% Caucasian, 50% married, and 38% first born. The majority of the participants were middle aged between the ages of 34 and 54 years with educational levels from eleventh grade through graduate school. Results and Conclusions: Zero-ordered correlations revealed significant relationships between hardiness and well-being (r=.53, p< .01), social support and well-being (r=.44, p< .01), and health promoting behaviors and well-being (r=.36, p< .01). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to test the explanatory power of the combination of hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors in well-being. Hardiness was the only variable that met the study's inclusion criteria and accounted for 28% of the variance in well-being F(1,100)=38.95, p< .000. A secondary analysis revealed that psychological well-being contributed significantly to the relationship with each individual variable, and that physical well-being had little if any contribution to this relationship. A secondary analysis of the explanatory power of the combined variables revealed that all three independent variables contributed to the variance in psychological well-being (hardiness 31%, social support 7%, and health promoting behaviors 2%). Only hardiness contributed to the variance in physical well-being and accounted for a meager 4% of the variance. The findings of this study provide empirical support that men and women who possess the personality characteristic of hardiness, perceive that they have higher levels of social support, and participate in health promoting behaviors report higher levels of well-being. However, when the relationship between well-being and the effect of all three independent variables are analyzed, only individuals with hardiness report higher levels of well-being. The secondary analysis suggests that physical and psychological well-being are different events and require different predictors. This research demonstrates that social and psychological factors can be even more powerful than physical health when it comes to well-being, especially psychological well-being. Implications for Practice: Implications for nursing focus on educating patients and significant others, encouraging and facilitating supportive environments, and enabling individuals to cope with the demands of CFS and positively adapt to their limitations. Attention to explanatory mechanisms such as these variables is particularly important in the case of chronic illness where the focus is on facilitating coping and adaptation to ongoing health problems in ways that contribute to quality of life rather than cure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of well-being in chronic illnessen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarberio, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Barberio, PhD, APN,C, Lebanon, New Jersey, USA, email: jabphd83@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163700-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Forty-Five percent of the U.S. population is diagnosed with a chronic illness. The perception of stress and subsequent illness representation impact the subjective state of an individual's well-being. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) was the prototypic chronic illness under study because it has multifactorial dimensions that involve the psyche and soma. The diagnosis and treatment of CFS effects the physical, psychological, and social self, and impacts the perception of stress and well-being. Hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors were the predictors of well-being under study. These predictors have been identified in the psychology literature as resistance resources that can neutralize the otherwise debilitating effects of stressful life events. Research Questions: This study tested the relationship between well-being and the presence of the resistance resources of hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors, individually and combined, in 102 men and women diagnosed with CFS. Framework: Antonovsky's (1979) research on the effects of stress on the health of an individual and resistance resources that may neutralize the debilitating effects of stressful life events guided this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational design was used to assess hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors individually with well-being and multiple regression analysis was used to assess the combined effect on well-being. Hardiness was measured by the Personal Views Survey (PVS)(50 items, alpha=.85), social support by the Personal Resource Questionnaire, Part II (PRQ85 II)(25 item, alpha=.93), health promoting behaviors by the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II)(52 items, alpha=.92),and well-being by the Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36)(36 item, alpha=.96)in the participant's home. The sample (N=102) which was recruited from medical practices, CFS conferences and newsletters, and the internet were 85% female, 93% Caucasian, 50% married, and 38% first born. The majority of the participants were middle aged between the ages of 34 and 54 years with educational levels from eleventh grade through graduate school. Results and Conclusions: Zero-ordered correlations revealed significant relationships between hardiness and well-being (r=.53, p< .01), social support and well-being (r=.44, p< .01), and health promoting behaviors and well-being (r=.36, p< .01). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to test the explanatory power of the combination of hardiness, social support, and health promoting behaviors in well-being. Hardiness was the only variable that met the study's inclusion criteria and accounted for 28% of the variance in well-being F(1,100)=38.95, p< .000. A secondary analysis revealed that psychological well-being contributed significantly to the relationship with each individual variable, and that physical well-being had little if any contribution to this relationship. A secondary analysis of the explanatory power of the combined variables revealed that all three independent variables contributed to the variance in psychological well-being (hardiness 31%, social support 7%, and health promoting behaviors 2%). Only hardiness contributed to the variance in physical well-being and accounted for a meager 4% of the variance. The findings of this study provide empirical support that men and women who possess the personality characteristic of hardiness, perceive that they have higher levels of social support, and participate in health promoting behaviors report higher levels of well-being. However, when the relationship between well-being and the effect of all three independent variables are analyzed, only individuals with hardiness report higher levels of well-being. The secondary analysis suggests that physical and psychological well-being are different events and require different predictors. This research demonstrates that social and psychological factors can be even more powerful than physical health when it comes to well-being, especially psychological well-being. Implications for Practice: Implications for nursing focus on educating patients and significant others, encouraging and facilitating supportive environments, and enabling individuals to cope with the demands of CFS and positively adapt to their limitations. Attention to explanatory mechanisms such as these variables is particularly important in the case of chronic illness where the focus is on facilitating coping and adaptation to ongoing health problems in ways that contribute to quality of life rather than cure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:17Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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