2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163701
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A model for taxol-induced painful peripheral neuropathy in rats
Author(s):
Polomano, Rosemary
Author Details:
Rosemary Polomano, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rpolomano@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Taxol, an effective chemotherapeutic agent, produces a dose-limiting painful peripheral neuropathy. Rodent models for Taxol neurotoxicity have been developed, but most use doses that cause such severe motor deficits that they are not translatable to the human case. Previous work by the investigator has shown that Taxol doses of 0.5 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg given every other day for four days produce significant hyperalgesia, which is exaggerated pain to a stimulus that is typically painful, and allodynia, pain from a stimulus that is not typically painful, in the rat's hind paw. The purpose of this investigation was to find the lowest dose that evokes abnormal pain responses in rats. Specific Aims: To test the hypothesis that the 0.5 mg/kg dose was the rat's threshold for producing a painful neuropathy, and lower doses would have no appreciable effect on pain-evoked responses. Methods: Thirty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either IP Cremophor (vehicle control), 0.125 mg/kg, 0.25 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg, which was administered every other day for four doses. Repeated measurements of sensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli were conducted for 40 days following the initial injection. Results and conclusions: A significant reduction in latency to hind paw withdrawal responses to heat was noted in the 0.5 mg/kg group (p< 0.05; days 15 to 40) compared to controls, but not seen in the other groups. Cold-allodynia was also only present in the 0.5 mg/kg group (days 13 to 40) evidenced by increased frequency of responses to acetone compared to controls (p< 0.05). Rats treated with 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg showed early signs of mechano-allodynia, but this was more consistently severe in the 0.5 mg/kg group (p< 0.01). Mean duration of paw withdrawals to a "pin prick" was similar among groups demonstrating the absence of measurable mechano-hyperalgesia. Taxol doses of 0.5 mg/kg for a total of 2 mg/kg approximate the rat's threshold for producing a painful neuropathy. Implications: Progress in treating Taxol-induced peripheral neurotoxicity will depend on appropriate rodent models that use established dosing parameters which are capable of producing the same manifestations observed in humans.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA model for taxol-induced painful peripheral neuropathy in ratsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPolomano, Rosemaryen_US
dc.author.detailsRosemary Polomano, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rpolomano@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163701-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Taxol, an effective chemotherapeutic agent, produces a dose-limiting painful peripheral neuropathy. Rodent models for Taxol neurotoxicity have been developed, but most use doses that cause such severe motor deficits that they are not translatable to the human case. Previous work by the investigator has shown that Taxol doses of 0.5 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg given every other day for four days produce significant hyperalgesia, which is exaggerated pain to a stimulus that is typically painful, and allodynia, pain from a stimulus that is not typically painful, in the rat's hind paw. The purpose of this investigation was to find the lowest dose that evokes abnormal pain responses in rats. Specific Aims: To test the hypothesis that the 0.5 mg/kg dose was the rat's threshold for producing a painful neuropathy, and lower doses would have no appreciable effect on pain-evoked responses. Methods: Thirty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either IP Cremophor (vehicle control), 0.125 mg/kg, 0.25 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg, which was administered every other day for four doses. Repeated measurements of sensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli were conducted for 40 days following the initial injection. Results and conclusions: A significant reduction in latency to hind paw withdrawal responses to heat was noted in the 0.5 mg/kg group (p< 0.05; days 15 to 40) compared to controls, but not seen in the other groups. Cold-allodynia was also only present in the 0.5 mg/kg group (days 13 to 40) evidenced by increased frequency of responses to acetone compared to controls (p< 0.05). Rats treated with 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg showed early signs of mechano-allodynia, but this was more consistently severe in the 0.5 mg/kg group (p< 0.01). Mean duration of paw withdrawals to a "pin prick" was similar among groups demonstrating the absence of measurable mechano-hyperalgesia. Taxol doses of 0.5 mg/kg for a total of 2 mg/kg approximate the rat's threshold for producing a painful neuropathy. Implications: Progress in treating Taxol-induced peripheral neurotoxicity will depend on appropriate rodent models that use established dosing parameters which are capable of producing the same manifestations observed in humans.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:18Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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