A comparison of music to music with mother's voice on physiological responses and level of sedation with critically ill infants and children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163702
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison of music to music with mother's voice on physiological responses and level of sedation with critically ill infants and children
Author(s):
Polomano, Rosemary; Shirk, Beverly; Stouffer, Janice W.
Author Details:
Rosemary Polomano, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rpolomano@psu.edu; Beverly Shirk; Janice W. Stouffer
Abstract:
Purpose: The systematic application of music mediates physiological and psychological responses to stress in both neonates and adults; however, little is known about the advantages of combining music with mother's voice for therapeutic interventions with critically ill infants and young children. Specific Aims: To compare the effects of a blank audio tape, music alone (MA), and simultaneous music and mother's voice (MMV) on physiological variables and levels of sedation. Methods: A repeated measures crossover design was used to evaluate the effects of a blank audiotape, MA, and MMV on physiological responses and sedation. Twenty-nine subjects (> 3 months to 8 years) who required mechanical ventilation received all three treatments: blank audiotape, MA, and MMV for 2 consecutive trials each and in random order. Nurse raters and parents were blind to treatment conditions. The tapes were played for 20 minutes, and subjects monitored for 60 minutes. Baseline measurements of physiological parameters and level of sedation using the Sedation-Agitation Scale were obtained, and subsequent measurements taken at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine within-subject and between-group differences over time for physiological variables and levels of sedation. Results and Conclusions: No significant between-group differences were noted for heart rate, respiratory rate and diastolic blood pressure over time. MMV produced increased sedation levels (p< 0.05) with a significant carryover effect to 60 minutes (p< 0.01) compared to the blank and MA audiotapes. A coinciding reduction in O2 saturation levels (p< 0.001) was also observed with MMV, but this clinically insignificant decrease can occur from increased sedation resulting in lower minute ventilation. Mean systolic blood pressure was lower for both MA and MMV and approached statistical significance (p=0.06 and p=0.55, respectively) from blank audiotape measurements. MMV appears to be better than MA in maintaining desired levels of sedation with mechanical ventilation. Implications: The combination of music and mother's voice has important implications for relaxing critically ill infants and children and reducing the need for sedating agents. Because music therapists now practice in hospital-based settings, it is critical that nurses understand the therapeutic benefits of music therapy techniques.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of music to music with mother's voice on physiological responses and level of sedation with critically ill infants and childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPolomano, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.authorShirk, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorStouffer, Janice W.en_US
dc.author.detailsRosemary Polomano, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rpolomano@psu.edu; Beverly Shirk; Janice W. Stoufferen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163702-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The systematic application of music mediates physiological and psychological responses to stress in both neonates and adults; however, little is known about the advantages of combining music with mother's voice for therapeutic interventions with critically ill infants and young children. Specific Aims: To compare the effects of a blank audio tape, music alone (MA), and simultaneous music and mother's voice (MMV) on physiological variables and levels of sedation. Methods: A repeated measures crossover design was used to evaluate the effects of a blank audiotape, MA, and MMV on physiological responses and sedation. Twenty-nine subjects (> 3 months to 8 years) who required mechanical ventilation received all three treatments: blank audiotape, MA, and MMV for 2 consecutive trials each and in random order. Nurse raters and parents were blind to treatment conditions. The tapes were played for 20 minutes, and subjects monitored for 60 minutes. Baseline measurements of physiological parameters and level of sedation using the Sedation-Agitation Scale were obtained, and subsequent measurements taken at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 minutes. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine within-subject and between-group differences over time for physiological variables and levels of sedation. Results and Conclusions: No significant between-group differences were noted for heart rate, respiratory rate and diastolic blood pressure over time. MMV produced increased sedation levels (p< 0.05) with a significant carryover effect to 60 minutes (p< 0.01) compared to the blank and MA audiotapes. A coinciding reduction in O2 saturation levels (p< 0.001) was also observed with MMV, but this clinically insignificant decrease can occur from increased sedation resulting in lower minute ventilation. Mean systolic blood pressure was lower for both MA and MMV and approached statistical significance (p=0.06 and p=0.55, respectively) from blank audiotape measurements. MMV appears to be better than MA in maintaining desired levels of sedation with mechanical ventilation. Implications: The combination of music and mother's voice has important implications for relaxing critically ill infants and children and reducing the need for sedating agents. Because music therapists now practice in hospital-based settings, it is critical that nurses understand the therapeutic benefits of music therapy techniques.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:19Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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