The effects of stigma on the sexual risk behaviors of rural men who have sex with men (MSM)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163706
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of stigma on the sexual risk behaviors of rural men who have sex with men (MSM)
Author(s):
Preston, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Preston, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Belleville, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dqp@psu.edu
Abstract:
Introduction: During the past 15 years, many studies have examined the risky sexual behavior of men who have sex with men. Overall, results have shown that high risk behavior is related to a preference for receptive anal sex, multiple partners, lack of condom use, and high substance use during sexual encounters. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship of these to stigma. In addition, most of the studies have been conducted on urban MSM. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the sexual risk behavior of rural MSM and to examine the relationship to this behavior of the stigma held by their families, health care providers and the rural communities in which they live. Method: Respondents completed a questionnaire that included measures of sexual risk (practice of receptive anal sex, number of partners, and condom use), mental health status (depression, self-esteem, personal homonegativity) and stigma (attitudes about HIV and sexual orientation held by family and friends, health care providers and the rural community). Findings: In terms of level of risk, 48% of the respondents were found to be at moderately high to high risk. Bivariate analysis indicated that low self-esteem and depression were significantly related to high risk sexual behavior while the respondents' perceptions of stigma held by family and community were found to be related to self-esteem.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of stigma on the sexual risk behaviors of rural men who have sex with men (MSM)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Preston, Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Belleville, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dqp@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163706-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: During the past 15 years, many studies have examined the risky sexual behavior of men who have sex with men. Overall, results have shown that high risk behavior is related to a preference for receptive anal sex, multiple partners, lack of condom use, and high substance use during sexual encounters. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship of these to stigma. In addition, most of the studies have been conducted on urban MSM. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the sexual risk behavior of rural MSM and to examine the relationship to this behavior of the stigma held by their families, health care providers and the rural communities in which they live. Method: Respondents completed a questionnaire that included measures of sexual risk (practice of receptive anal sex, number of partners, and condom use), mental health status (depression, self-esteem, personal homonegativity) and stigma (attitudes about HIV and sexual orientation held by family and friends, health care providers and the rural community). Findings: In terms of level of risk, 48% of the respondents were found to be at moderately high to high risk. Bivariate analysis indicated that low self-esteem and depression were significantly related to high risk sexual behavior while the respondents' perceptions of stigma held by family and community were found to be related to self-esteem.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:23Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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