Nurses' lived experience of caring for patients at the end of their lives - implications for nursing education and management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163707
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' lived experience of caring for patients at the end of their lives - implications for nursing education and management
Author(s):
Prestoy, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Prestoy, Kutztown University, School of Nursing, Quakertown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: prestoy@kutztown.edu
Abstract:
Nurses are the primary caregivers to patients and their families. They spend more time with these individuals than any other health care provider. Until recently however, nurses received very limited education that specifically addressed the needs of the patient and family at the end of life. Similarly, the caregiving needs and lived experience of those professionals who work most closely with the dying is not clearly understood. Nurses' knowledge and ability to provide comprehensive care, and to function as a key member of the health care team has been assumed rather than explored. Also, nurses' own emotional reactions to their patient's death, and how nurses are impacted by dealing with the dying has not received sufficient attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of nurses who had cared for individuals who were dying, or had died while in their care. An open-ended research question asked participants to describe a professional experience with a dying patient and the patient's family, including the patient's and family's feelings, reactions, and adaptation, and the participant/nurse's feelings, reactions, and adaptation. The Roy Adaptation Model served as the theoretical framework for the study. Utilizing a Phenomenological/Case Study analysis method, 88 case studies were submitted by 24 registered nurses who worked in a variety of clinical settings. Cases were also shared verbally in group and individual meetings with the researcher. The researcher became immersed in the data, reading and re-reading data to identify key concepts. Data analysis involved a search for meaning, and a constant comparative method. Trustworthiness was maintained through extensive data, prolonged engagement in the study, triangulation of data and reflexability. Seven themes were discovered that reveal nurses are actual witnesses to the death experience, who develop close relationships with patients and families, provide support, and are emotionally impacted by those experiences. Feelings of being powerless and inadequately prepared were also discovered. The findings suggest that nursing education and management need to develop interventions to address these areas.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' lived experience of caring for patients at the end of their lives - implications for nursing education and managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrestoy, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Prestoy, Kutztown University, School of Nursing, Quakertown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: prestoy@kutztown.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163707-
dc.description.abstractNurses are the primary caregivers to patients and their families. They spend more time with these individuals than any other health care provider. Until recently however, nurses received very limited education that specifically addressed the needs of the patient and family at the end of life. Similarly, the caregiving needs and lived experience of those professionals who work most closely with the dying is not clearly understood. Nurses' knowledge and ability to provide comprehensive care, and to function as a key member of the health care team has been assumed rather than explored. Also, nurses' own emotional reactions to their patient's death, and how nurses are impacted by dealing with the dying has not received sufficient attention. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of nurses who had cared for individuals who were dying, or had died while in their care. An open-ended research question asked participants to describe a professional experience with a dying patient and the patient's family, including the patient's and family's feelings, reactions, and adaptation, and the participant/nurse's feelings, reactions, and adaptation. The Roy Adaptation Model served as the theoretical framework for the study. Utilizing a Phenomenological/Case Study analysis method, 88 case studies were submitted by 24 registered nurses who worked in a variety of clinical settings. Cases were also shared verbally in group and individual meetings with the researcher. The researcher became immersed in the data, reading and re-reading data to identify key concepts. Data analysis involved a search for meaning, and a constant comparative method. Trustworthiness was maintained through extensive data, prolonged engagement in the study, triangulation of data and reflexability. Seven themes were discovered that reveal nurses are actual witnesses to the death experience, who develop close relationships with patients and families, provide support, and are emotionally impacted by those experiences. Feelings of being powerless and inadequately prepared were also discovered. The findings suggest that nursing education and management need to develop interventions to address these areas.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:25Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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