The Satisfaction of Family Needs of Critically Ill Patients: A Comparison of Visiting Policies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163710
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Satisfaction of Family Needs of Critically Ill Patients: A Comparison of Visiting Policies
Author(s):
Laramee, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Laramee, MS, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: ann.laramee@vtmednet.org
Abstract:
The satisfaction of family needs of critically ill patients: A comparison of visiting policies. Conference Sponsor: Eastern Nursing Research Society. Conference Year: 1995. There has been a recent trend towards more open and liberalized visiting policies in critical care settings. Despite this trend many units continue to restrict visitation largely because of concern that such change would have a negative impact on the patients, families, and nursing. The purpose of this study was to determine how families with a family member in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) rank the importance and satisfaction of their perceived needs and whether there is a significant difference between restricted and open individualized visiting policies in meeting these perceived needs. A quasi-experimental design was used and conducted in two phases. In the control phase, 30 family subjects, experiencing a restricted visiting policy completed the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI)(Leske, 1986; Molter, 1979) in a structured interview format. In the experimental phase, the CCFNI was administered to another 30 family subjects two weeks after the implementation of an open individualized visiting policy. Family subjects were a convenience sample, 18 years or older and had visited their family member in the SICU at least three times. The ill adult family member was in a 16 bed SICU at least 48 hours. The mean scores of the total sample were used to determine the highest ranking needs of importance. The t-tests for independent samples were used to ascertain the significant difference between the experimental and the control groups' ranking of the importance and satisfaction of need statements. The probability level of less than 5% was the level of significance for all statistics calculated. The study's highest ranking 14 most important family needs were similar to other investigations done over the past 14 years (Daley, 1984; Kleinpell & Powers, 1992; Leske, 1986; Molter, 1979; Norris & Grove, 1986; Price, Forrester, Murphy, & Monaghan, 1991). This finding suggests that specific family needs are consistently perceived to be important to family members of ICU patients. Assurance needs were found to be the most important to families, followed by needs for information concerning the patient's condition and treatment and the need to be with the patient. The experimental group's satisfaction means were greater than the control group's for 40 of the 45 CCFNI need statements. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups satisfaction levels for 20 need items. Of those 20 items, 8 were among the 14 most important needs for this sample of subjects. A change in visiting policy from a restricted policy to an open individualized visiting policy was an intervention found to meet the majority of family needs at a higher satisfaction level.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
1995
Conference Name:
ENRS 7th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Satisfaction of Family Needs of Critically Ill Patients: A Comparison of Visiting Policiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaramee, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Laramee, MS, Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: ann.laramee@vtmednet.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163710-
dc.description.abstractThe satisfaction of family needs of critically ill patients: A comparison of visiting policies. Conference Sponsor: Eastern Nursing Research Society. Conference Year: 1995. There has been a recent trend towards more open and liberalized visiting policies in critical care settings. Despite this trend many units continue to restrict visitation largely because of concern that such change would have a negative impact on the patients, families, and nursing. The purpose of this study was to determine how families with a family member in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) rank the importance and satisfaction of their perceived needs and whether there is a significant difference between restricted and open individualized visiting policies in meeting these perceived needs. A quasi-experimental design was used and conducted in two phases. In the control phase, 30 family subjects, experiencing a restricted visiting policy completed the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI)(Leske, 1986; Molter, 1979) in a structured interview format. In the experimental phase, the CCFNI was administered to another 30 family subjects two weeks after the implementation of an open individualized visiting policy. Family subjects were a convenience sample, 18 years or older and had visited their family member in the SICU at least three times. The ill adult family member was in a 16 bed SICU at least 48 hours. The mean scores of the total sample were used to determine the highest ranking needs of importance. The t-tests for independent samples were used to ascertain the significant difference between the experimental and the control groups' ranking of the importance and satisfaction of need statements. The probability level of less than 5% was the level of significance for all statistics calculated. The study's highest ranking 14 most important family needs were similar to other investigations done over the past 14 years (Daley, 1984; Kleinpell & Powers, 1992; Leske, 1986; Molter, 1979; Norris & Grove, 1986; Price, Forrester, Murphy, & Monaghan, 1991). This finding suggests that specific family needs are consistently perceived to be important to family members of ICU patients. Assurance needs were found to be the most important to families, followed by needs for information concerning the patient's condition and treatment and the need to be with the patient. The experimental group's satisfaction means were greater than the control group's for 40 of the 45 CCFNI need statements. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups satisfaction levels for 20 need items. Of those 20 items, 8 were among the 14 most important needs for this sample of subjects. A change in visiting policy from a restricted policy to an open individualized visiting policy was an intervention found to meet the majority of family needs at a higher satisfaction level.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:28Z-
dc.conference.date1995en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 7th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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