2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163711
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Secondary Data Analysis of a National Family Survey Using Relational Data
Author(s):
Carroll, Ruth
Author Details:
Ruth Carroll, Salisbury State University, Department of Nursing, Henson School of Science, Salisbury, Maryland, USA, email: rmcarroll@ssu.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to describe the secondary data analysis and findings from a national study of the family. The interest of the nursing discipline in the promotion of family health and the potential for examining responses from more than one family member led to the selection and secondary analysis of the National Commission on Children's 1990 Survey of Parents and Children. This survey collected nationally representative data on the current state of family life, the quality of the relationships between parents and their children and their interactions with major institutions from 1,738 parents who live with their children in the continental United States. Nine hundred and twenty nine children aged 10 to 17 from the same households were also interviewed. The subsample of data from the larger survey that includes both parent and child in the same family permits the analysis of parent-child relational data. Relational data are derived from the responses of individual family members combined or contrasted in some way to indicate a family characteristic (Fisher et al. 1985). The difficulty of combining scores from two family members in a theoretically meaningful way has been acknowledged (Feetham, 1984). Techniques to analyze and combine relational data, such as exploratory data analysis (Feetham, Perkins, & Carroll, 1993) distributions of dyadic scores (Jacobsen, Tulman & Lowery, 1991) and planned comparisons between related and random dyads (Glass & Polisar, 1987) are presented using examples from the national survey. One area of family health promotion selected was the parent and child's attitude about the child becoming infected with the AIDS virus. Findings are presented that compare the meaning of aggregated individual data with paired family responses. Implications of the findings for practice are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
1995
Conference Name:
ENRS 7th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSecondary Data Analysis of a National Family Survey Using Relational Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Ruthen_US
dc.author.detailsRuth Carroll, Salisbury State University, Department of Nursing, Henson School of Science, Salisbury, Maryland, USA, email: rmcarroll@ssu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163711-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to describe the secondary data analysis and findings from a national study of the family. The interest of the nursing discipline in the promotion of family health and the potential for examining responses from more than one family member led to the selection and secondary analysis of the National Commission on Children's 1990 Survey of Parents and Children. This survey collected nationally representative data on the current state of family life, the quality of the relationships between parents and their children and their interactions with major institutions from 1,738 parents who live with their children in the continental United States. Nine hundred and twenty nine children aged 10 to 17 from the same households were also interviewed. The subsample of data from the larger survey that includes both parent and child in the same family permits the analysis of parent-child relational data. Relational data are derived from the responses of individual family members combined or contrasted in some way to indicate a family characteristic (Fisher et al. 1985). The difficulty of combining scores from two family members in a theoretically meaningful way has been acknowledged (Feetham, 1984). Techniques to analyze and combine relational data, such as exploratory data analysis (Feetham, Perkins, & Carroll, 1993) distributions of dyadic scores (Jacobsen, Tulman & Lowery, 1991) and planned comparisons between related and random dyads (Glass & Polisar, 1987) are presented using examples from the national survey. One area of family health promotion selected was the parent and child's attitude about the child becoming infected with the AIDS virus. Findings are presented that compare the meaning of aggregated individual data with paired family responses. Implications of the findings for practice are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:29Z-
dc.conference.date1995en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 7th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.