Evaluation of a Professional + Peer Intervention With Spinal Cord Injured Individuals Following Rehabilitation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163712
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of a Professional + Peer Intervention With Spinal Cord Injured Individuals Following Rehabilitation
Author(s):
Lucke, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Lucke, Dean of Health Sciences and Professor, Elmira College, Elmira, New York, USA, email: klucke@elmira.edu
Abstract:
As more spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals survive their initial injury and the lifespan for these individuals approaches that of the uninjured population, it is imperative to address quality of life (QOL) issues. Economic forces dramatically reduced the inpatient rehabilitation stay for SCI individuals, thus shortening the time to learn the necessary techniques to manage a physically changed body and develop strategies to reenter the world as a person with disability. The purpose of this longitudinal feasibility study was to evaluate the effect of an individualized professional + peer intervention, designed to continue the process of knowledge acquisition, decision-making, and social interaction, on hope and quality of life, during the initial six months following rehabilitation. This experimental project uses triangulation of methods to compare the effect of a professional + peer intervention with that of usual care during the first six months after rehabilitation. A prospective 2-group by 5-episode repeated measures design was used for the quantitative portion where the independent variable is the professional + peer intervention and the dependent variables are hope and quality of life. Grounded theory was used for the qualitative portion of the study to identify factors that enhance and inhibit hope and QOL and to refine the relationship between hope and QOL in the reintegration model. An intensive individualized intervention, using registered nurses and expert peers, provided a post-rehabilitation transition period whereby SCI individuals continued to acquire knowledge and decision-making skills within a supportive relationship. Registered nurses provided a telephone intervention bi-weekly for six weeks post-discharge. Expert peers matched for age, type of injury and social circumstances provided either face-to-face or telephone intervention for the subsequent 4 months post-discharge. Evaluation data were obtained at 1, 3, and 6 months from face-to-face interviews, and 2 measures of hope, the Herth Hope Index and the Miller Hope Scale, and 2 measures of QOL, the Life Situation Survey and the MOS SF-36. Data analysis will include a 2 by 5 linear, mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and grounded theory. Preliminary analysis indicates participants in the usual care group maintained a stable level of hope and QOL between 1 and 3 months, reporting a slight improvement at 6 months. Participants in the intervention group reported somewhat earlier and greater improvements in hope and QOL over the six month period. Qualitative data suggests there are subsets of SCI individuals who could benefit from different types of interventions to provide a transition period following discharge from rehabilitation. Recommendations include at least 3 types of individualized interventions which could be designed for SCI individuals to continue knowledge acquisition and decision-making within a supportive relationship following discharge from rehabilitation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of a Professional + Peer Intervention With Spinal Cord Injured Individuals Following Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLucke, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Lucke, Dean of Health Sciences and Professor, Elmira College, Elmira, New York, USA, email: klucke@elmira.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163712-
dc.description.abstractAs more spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals survive their initial injury and the lifespan for these individuals approaches that of the uninjured population, it is imperative to address quality of life (QOL) issues. Economic forces dramatically reduced the inpatient rehabilitation stay for SCI individuals, thus shortening the time to learn the necessary techniques to manage a physically changed body and develop strategies to reenter the world as a person with disability. The purpose of this longitudinal feasibility study was to evaluate the effect of an individualized professional + peer intervention, designed to continue the process of knowledge acquisition, decision-making, and social interaction, on hope and quality of life, during the initial six months following rehabilitation. This experimental project uses triangulation of methods to compare the effect of a professional + peer intervention with that of usual care during the first six months after rehabilitation. A prospective 2-group by 5-episode repeated measures design was used for the quantitative portion where the independent variable is the professional + peer intervention and the dependent variables are hope and quality of life. Grounded theory was used for the qualitative portion of the study to identify factors that enhance and inhibit hope and QOL and to refine the relationship between hope and QOL in the reintegration model. An intensive individualized intervention, using registered nurses and expert peers, provided a post-rehabilitation transition period whereby SCI individuals continued to acquire knowledge and decision-making skills within a supportive relationship. Registered nurses provided a telephone intervention bi-weekly for six weeks post-discharge. Expert peers matched for age, type of injury and social circumstances provided either face-to-face or telephone intervention for the subsequent 4 months post-discharge. Evaluation data were obtained at 1, 3, and 6 months from face-to-face interviews, and 2 measures of hope, the Herth Hope Index and the Miller Hope Scale, and 2 measures of QOL, the Life Situation Survey and the MOS SF-36. Data analysis will include a 2 by 5 linear, mixed model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and grounded theory. Preliminary analysis indicates participants in the usual care group maintained a stable level of hope and QOL between 1 and 3 months, reporting a slight improvement at 6 months. Participants in the intervention group reported somewhat earlier and greater improvements in hope and QOL over the six month period. Qualitative data suggests there are subsets of SCI individuals who could benefit from different types of interventions to provide a transition period following discharge from rehabilitation. Recommendations include at least 3 types of individualized interventions which could be designed for SCI individuals to continue knowledge acquisition and decision-making within a supportive relationship following discharge from rehabilitation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:30Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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