Disabled Children, Violent Adolescents and Pregnant Girls: Ecological Perspectives for the Prevention of Negative Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163716
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Disabled Children, Violent Adolescents and Pregnant Girls: Ecological Perspectives for the Prevention of Negative Outcomes
Author(s):
Little, Liza
Author Details:
Liza Little, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.edu
Abstract:
Nursing research on vulnerable populations of children over the last two decades has targeted cohorts of children who are likely to develop negative health outcomes, to begin identifying risk factors and issues of individual vulnerability. What is often lacking in these analyses is an ecological perspective that takes into account the interaction and connections between the individual child, his or her family and their community (Bronfenbrenner, 1977). The individual environment includes relationships the child or adolescent has with family and caregivers. The social environment includes the relationships with the community , schools and professionals and the context of resources and access to the community. The cultural environment includes the societal attitudes held towards risk and vulnerability in different groups (attitudes held about disabled children, pregnant girls and violent teens). It is how all three of these levels interact and influence each other to create risk for negative health outcomes that these presentations will address. The purpose of this symposium is to examine both the individual, social and cultural factors using several different types of ecological frameworks for three diverse groups of children at risk: children with Asperger's- spectrum disorders, violent adolescents and pregnant girls. The studies presented here also demonstrate how different methodologies can be used to examine similar types of questions. The first two presentations address risk factors for victimization of children. The first presentation uses an ecological framework to examine the prevalence and relationship between parental victimization at home and peer victimization in school for a group of children with Asperger-spectrum disorders. The second presentation is drawn from a secondary data analysis that examines both individual factors and situational/contextual factors for their relative power as explanatory variables in adolescent violence. Here Cox's interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (Cox, 1982) serves as the framework for the study. The third presentation, based in grounded theory, is a qualitative examination of the experiences of pregnant teenagers and the focus of this study is on the importance of individual, familial and community factors that influence risk and coping in this vulnerable population. The goal of this symposium is to address the utility of ecological frames for nurses in the identification, planning, treatment and prevention of the victimization of children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDisabled Children, Violent Adolescents and Pregnant Girls: Ecological Perspectives for the Prevention of Negative Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Lizaen_US
dc.author.detailsLiza Little, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163716-
dc.description.abstractNursing research on vulnerable populations of children over the last two decades has targeted cohorts of children who are likely to develop negative health outcomes, to begin identifying risk factors and issues of individual vulnerability. What is often lacking in these analyses is an ecological perspective that takes into account the interaction and connections between the individual child, his or her family and their community (Bronfenbrenner, 1977). The individual environment includes relationships the child or adolescent has with family and caregivers. The social environment includes the relationships with the community , schools and professionals and the context of resources and access to the community. The cultural environment includes the societal attitudes held towards risk and vulnerability in different groups (attitudes held about disabled children, pregnant girls and violent teens). It is how all three of these levels interact and influence each other to create risk for negative health outcomes that these presentations will address. The purpose of this symposium is to examine both the individual, social and cultural factors using several different types of ecological frameworks for three diverse groups of children at risk: children with Asperger's- spectrum disorders, violent adolescents and pregnant girls. The studies presented here also demonstrate how different methodologies can be used to examine similar types of questions. The first two presentations address risk factors for victimization of children. The first presentation uses an ecological framework to examine the prevalence and relationship between parental victimization at home and peer victimization in school for a group of children with Asperger-spectrum disorders. The second presentation is drawn from a secondary data analysis that examines both individual factors and situational/contextual factors for their relative power as explanatory variables in adolescent violence. Here Cox's interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (Cox, 1982) serves as the framework for the study. The third presentation, based in grounded theory, is a qualitative examination of the experiences of pregnant teenagers and the focus of this study is on the importance of individual, familial and community factors that influence risk and coping in this vulnerable population. The goal of this symposium is to address the utility of ecological frames for nurses in the identification, planning, treatment and prevention of the victimization of children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:34Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.