Victimization of Children With Asperger Spectrum Disorders: Parental, Peer and Contextual Factors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163717
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Victimization of Children With Asperger Spectrum Disorders: Parental, Peer and Contextual Factors
Author(s):
Little, Liza
Author Details:
Liza Little, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Disabled children are sexually and physically abused at twice the rates of children without disabilities. Few studies however, have studied specific groups of children with specific types of disabilities or examined correlates of victimization. The purpose of this study was to examine the yearly prevalence rates and frequencies of peer victimization and parental discipline for a large national sample of middleclass mothers with children with Asperger-spectrum disorders. Framework: Ecological perspectives on the victimization of disabled children suggest that violence is systemic in the lives of children with disabilities. It occurs at home and in the school community. Research posits that harsh parental discipline at home may contribute to peer victimization in school for children demonstrating the interactive influences of the individual environment and the social environment for the child. Attitudes towards these children suggest they are viewed as social "geeks" and "weird"; many are misdiagnosed and parents themselves become victimized by the unavailability of resources and difficulties in obtaining services. Victimization therefore becomes an ecological process of interacting forces at different levels of the environment. Design and sample: the data was obtained from an anonymous survey that was sent to families of children with AS-spectrum disorders. Invitations for participation were posted on two international web sites for parents. Among families that met the eligibility requirements the participation rate was 70%. Mothers for this data analysis completed a total of 411 surveys. There were 411 youth between the ages of 4-17 , 82% were male and 18% were female. The mothers' mean age was 41 and the majority was Caucasian, married, college educated and had middle class incomes. Findings and conclusion: The overall rate of peer victimization was 94% and the overall prevalence rate of using any type of parental corporal punishment was 58%. Gang attacks were five times higher for children with AS-spectrum disorders than a national internet sample of nondisabled children. Bullying rates were four times higher and peer and sibling assaults were two times higher. Being shunned by peers was significantly correlated with peer assault. Parents were also verbally abusing, slapping , pinching and shaking these children at higher rates than national samples of parents of nondisabled children. Finally, parental corporal punishment was significantly correlated with peer victimization. Nursing interventions are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVictimization of Children With Asperger Spectrum Disorders: Parental, Peer and Contextual Factorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Lizaen_US
dc.author.detailsLiza Little, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: llittle@christa.unh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163717-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Disabled children are sexually and physically abused at twice the rates of children without disabilities. Few studies however, have studied specific groups of children with specific types of disabilities or examined correlates of victimization. The purpose of this study was to examine the yearly prevalence rates and frequencies of peer victimization and parental discipline for a large national sample of middleclass mothers with children with Asperger-spectrum disorders. Framework: Ecological perspectives on the victimization of disabled children suggest that violence is systemic in the lives of children with disabilities. It occurs at home and in the school community. Research posits that harsh parental discipline at home may contribute to peer victimization in school for children demonstrating the interactive influences of the individual environment and the social environment for the child. Attitudes towards these children suggest they are viewed as social "geeks" and "weird"; many are misdiagnosed and parents themselves become victimized by the unavailability of resources and difficulties in obtaining services. Victimization therefore becomes an ecological process of interacting forces at different levels of the environment. Design and sample: the data was obtained from an anonymous survey that was sent to families of children with AS-spectrum disorders. Invitations for participation were posted on two international web sites for parents. Among families that met the eligibility requirements the participation rate was 70%. Mothers for this data analysis completed a total of 411 surveys. There were 411 youth between the ages of 4-17 , 82% were male and 18% were female. The mothers' mean age was 41 and the majority was Caucasian, married, college educated and had middle class incomes. Findings and conclusion: The overall rate of peer victimization was 94% and the overall prevalence rate of using any type of parental corporal punishment was 58%. Gang attacks were five times higher for children with AS-spectrum disorders than a national internet sample of nondisabled children. Bullying rates were four times higher and peer and sibling assaults were two times higher. Being shunned by peers was significantly correlated with peer assault. Parents were also verbally abusing, slapping , pinching and shaking these children at higher rates than national samples of parents of nondisabled children. Finally, parental corporal punishment was significantly correlated with peer victimization. Nursing interventions are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:35Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.