A Contextual Analysis of Adolescent Violence Using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163718
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Contextual Analysis of Adolescent Violence Using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior
Author(s):
DiNapoli, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela DiNapoli, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: ppdn@cisunix.unh.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to examine both individual factors and situational/contextual factors for their relative potential as significant explanatory variables in adolescent violence. Framework: Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (1982) served as the study's theoretical framework. Design and sample: A secondary data analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health) data-set N=20438 allowed for a multi-factorial examination of social, individual and environmental resource variables potentially associated with adolescent violence. Using multiple regression modeling techniques, together with the unique use of a factor analytic approach to the health outcome VIOLENCE- this study begins to uncover the underlying dimensions of the phenomenon of adolescent violence. Findings and conclusions: The best estimates of adolescent violence using the framework explained fifty-eight percent of the variance in violent behavior. The main findings of the study revealed that victimization by violence appeared as the single most important direct determinant of violence ((=.54). This study proposes that adolescents are being victimized as a result of a lack of supports within their social frameworks increasing their reliance on violence. While both boys and girls were victimized their motivations for violence appeared to be different. Parent communication and family togetherness directly influenced efficacy expectations and individual perceptions of self, important mediators of violence. Health promotion and policy interventions directed at these potentially modifiable mediators, as vehicles for reducing adolescent violence are introduced.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Contextual Analysis of Adolescent Violence Using the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavioren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDiNapoli, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela DiNapoli, University of New Hampshire, School of Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: ppdn@cisunix.unh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163718-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to examine both individual factors and situational/contextual factors for their relative potential as significant explanatory variables in adolescent violence. Framework: Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior (1982) served as the study's theoretical framework. Design and sample: A secondary data analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health) data-set N=20438 allowed for a multi-factorial examination of social, individual and environmental resource variables potentially associated with adolescent violence. Using multiple regression modeling techniques, together with the unique use of a factor analytic approach to the health outcome VIOLENCE- this study begins to uncover the underlying dimensions of the phenomenon of adolescent violence. Findings and conclusions: The best estimates of adolescent violence using the framework explained fifty-eight percent of the variance in violent behavior. The main findings of the study revealed that victimization by violence appeared as the single most important direct determinant of violence ((=.54). This study proposes that adolescents are being victimized as a result of a lack of supports within their social frameworks increasing their reliance on violence. While both boys and girls were victimized their motivations for violence appeared to be different. Parent communication and family togetherness directly influenced efficacy expectations and individual perceptions of self, important mediators of violence. Health promotion and policy interventions directed at these potentially modifiable mediators, as vehicles for reducing adolescent violence are introduced.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:36Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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