Delivery of Health Information to Active Older Adults Via Touchscreen Equipped Laptops

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163720
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Delivery of Health Information to Active Older Adults Via Touchscreen Equipped Laptops
Author(s):
Neafsey, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Neafsey, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: patricia.neafsey@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Many over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, nutritional supplements, herbal remedies, and alcohol conflict with prescription (Rx) medicines. Resulting interactions pose major impediments to optimal health in older adults. "Preventing Medicine Conflicts," an interactive "Personal Education Program" (PEP) housed on touchscreen equipped laptops, was tested in a senior center blood pressure clinic setting. The objectives were to increase older adults' knowledge of potential interactions of Rx antihypertensives and anticoagulants with OTC agents and alcohol and to increase their self-efficacy in how to avoid such interactions. Subjects were recruited on-site. Those who met age, vision, literacy, independence, and medication use criteria were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups, 33 subjects each. A repeated measures (3 time periods, 2 weeks apart), 3 group design (experimental (PEP use), conventional (information booklet), and control (no intervention)) was used. The PEP group completed a medication use survey and then used the PEP on laptops equipped with infrared sensitive touch screens. They were also given a booklet to read and take home that covers the information presented in the PEP. PEP subjects were tested for self-efficacy and knowledge immediately following PEP/booklet use and again 2 and 4 weeks later. The Conventional group completed the medication use survey, read the booklet and then was post-tested immediately and again 2 and 4 weeks later. The Control group received no intervention and was tested at the initial visit and again 2 and 4 weeks later. Conventional and Control subjects used the PEP following the study period. All subjects were given the opportunity throughout the study period to question a community health student nurse about their medications. Random assignment to groups was achieved as there were no differences among the groups in age, education, gender, or medication use (antihypertensives, low dose aspirin, warfarin, antacids, calcium supplements, acid reducers, pain relievers). There was a significant group effect for both knowledge and self-efficacy. Post-hoc analyses indicated that the PEP group had significantly higher self-efficacy and knowledge scores than both Conventional and Control groups at all 3 time points. The PEP group reported fewer adverse self-medication behaviors over time. Reported self-medication behaviors did not change over time for either the conventional or control groups. Subjects indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the PEP and reported their intent to make specific changes in self-mediation behaviors. The findings suggest that delivery of health information to older adults via touchscreen equipped laptops is effective and has the potential to revolutionize public health education provided by community health nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDelivery of Health Information to Active Older Adults Via Touchscreen Equipped Laptopsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeafsey, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Neafsey, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: patricia.neafsey@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163720-
dc.description.abstractMany over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, nutritional supplements, herbal remedies, and alcohol conflict with prescription (Rx) medicines. Resulting interactions pose major impediments to optimal health in older adults. "Preventing Medicine Conflicts," an interactive "Personal Education Program" (PEP) housed on touchscreen equipped laptops, was tested in a senior center blood pressure clinic setting. The objectives were to increase older adults' knowledge of potential interactions of Rx antihypertensives and anticoagulants with OTC agents and alcohol and to increase their self-efficacy in how to avoid such interactions. Subjects were recruited on-site. Those who met age, vision, literacy, independence, and medication use criteria were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups, 33 subjects each. A repeated measures (3 time periods, 2 weeks apart), 3 group design (experimental (PEP use), conventional (information booklet), and control (no intervention)) was used. The PEP group completed a medication use survey and then used the PEP on laptops equipped with infrared sensitive touch screens. They were also given a booklet to read and take home that covers the information presented in the PEP. PEP subjects were tested for self-efficacy and knowledge immediately following PEP/booklet use and again 2 and 4 weeks later. The Conventional group completed the medication use survey, read the booklet and then was post-tested immediately and again 2 and 4 weeks later. The Control group received no intervention and was tested at the initial visit and again 2 and 4 weeks later. Conventional and Control subjects used the PEP following the study period. All subjects were given the opportunity throughout the study period to question a community health student nurse about their medications. Random assignment to groups was achieved as there were no differences among the groups in age, education, gender, or medication use (antihypertensives, low dose aspirin, warfarin, antacids, calcium supplements, acid reducers, pain relievers). There was a significant group effect for both knowledge and self-efficacy. Post-hoc analyses indicated that the PEP group had significantly higher self-efficacy and knowledge scores than both Conventional and Control groups at all 3 time points. The PEP group reported fewer adverse self-medication behaviors over time. Reported self-medication behaviors did not change over time for either the conventional or control groups. Subjects indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the PEP and reported their intent to make specific changes in self-mediation behaviors. The findings suggest that delivery of health information to older adults via touchscreen equipped laptops is effective and has the potential to revolutionize public health education provided by community health nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:38Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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