2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163724
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Shared Interdisciplinary Learning: An International Dimension
Author(s):
Hegedus, K.
Author Details:
Kathryn Hegedus, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: kathryn.hegedus@uconn.edu
Abstract:
The worldwide sharing among nurses allows for the identification of similarities and diversities framing the universality of nursing practice. Developing a culturally based body of knowledge about nursing's caring dimension continues to build the knowledge base of the discipline. The Purpose of this study was to obtain exemplars from American and Hungarian nurses that serve to document the richness of nursing care. The Aim was to present paradigm cases that speak to the lived experience of practicing nurses using their language and culture. Framework Benner (1982) utilized the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to categorize five incremental levels of practice from Novice to Expert. Methodology Benner's (1984) guidelines provided direction for writing a "critical incident" or patient care episode for the written stories. The American nurses were undergraduate and graduate students. The Hungarian nurses were new graduates and experienced nurses who were participating in a workshop. The documents were translated to Hungarian and back translated to English for purposes of analysis. Confidentiality and anonymity were protected. Results the narratives illustrate the novice nurses in the U.S. and the new graduates in Hungary relying on rules and guidelines to direct their practice. The expert nurses in both countries pull from their enormous backgrounds of experience and have an intuitive grasp of the situation allowing them to quickly zero in on the problems. Implications for Knowledge Development the sharing of these stories captures the richness of nursing practice and highlights the unique contributions that nursing provides. They facilitate the documentation of nursing care as a source of nursing knowledge. The commonality of the themes suggests that Benner's Model serve to elicit intradisciplinary findings that have cross-cultural applicability.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleShared Interdisciplinary Learning: An International Dimensionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHegedus, K.en_US
dc.author.detailsKathryn Hegedus, University of Connecticut, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: kathryn.hegedus@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163724-
dc.description.abstractThe worldwide sharing among nurses allows for the identification of similarities and diversities framing the universality of nursing practice. Developing a culturally based body of knowledge about nursing's caring dimension continues to build the knowledge base of the discipline. The Purpose of this study was to obtain exemplars from American and Hungarian nurses that serve to document the richness of nursing care. The Aim was to present paradigm cases that speak to the lived experience of practicing nurses using their language and culture. Framework Benner (1982) utilized the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to categorize five incremental levels of practice from Novice to Expert. Methodology Benner's (1984) guidelines provided direction for writing a "critical incident" or patient care episode for the written stories. The American nurses were undergraduate and graduate students. The Hungarian nurses were new graduates and experienced nurses who were participating in a workshop. The documents were translated to Hungarian and back translated to English for purposes of analysis. Confidentiality and anonymity were protected. Results the narratives illustrate the novice nurses in the U.S. and the new graduates in Hungary relying on rules and guidelines to direct their practice. The expert nurses in both countries pull from their enormous backgrounds of experience and have an intuitive grasp of the situation allowing them to quickly zero in on the problems. Implications for Knowledge Development the sharing of these stories captures the richness of nursing practice and highlights the unique contributions that nursing provides. They facilitate the documentation of nursing care as a source of nursing knowledge. The commonality of the themes suggests that Benner's Model serve to elicit intradisciplinary findings that have cross-cultural applicability.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:42Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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