The Functional Abilities Essential for the Provision of Safe, Effective Nursing Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163725
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Functional Abilities Essential for the Provision of Safe, Effective Nursing Care
Author(s):
Yocom, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Yocom, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: yocom@nightingale.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
To practice nursing, a licensee must possess a multitude of knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) in order to provide safe and effective nursing care. The KSAs can be dichotomized into two groups: domain specific (i.e., specific to nursing practice) and non-domain specific (i.e., lift, push, see, etc.). With passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, nurse employers, educators and regulators expressed a need for documentation of the attributes essential to perform the full range of duties that a nurse must perform. The purpose of this study was to validate the essential non-domain specific functional abilities a nurse must possess in order to perform nursing activities in a safe, effective manner. The primary research question was: What are the functional abilities a person must possess in order to practice safely? The theoretical framework encompassed the normal range of psychomotor, cognitive and communicative skills, the neurological senses, and emotional capabilities. The target population for this descriptive study was all licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPN/VNs) and registered nurses (RNs) practicing in the United States. A sample of 10,000 nurses was randomly selected from among all licensed nurses listed on data tapes supplied by 28 states to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. Collectively, the sample represented all nurses licensed to practice in urban and rural areas of large and small states in all geographic regions of the U.S. A self-administered questionnaire, developed for use based on pilot work and focus group input, contained 98 representative attributes grouped within 16 functional ability categories. Content validity and internal consistency of the total scale and all sub-scales were supported. Final assignment of attributes to subscales was based on the results of a factor analysis. A multi-phase mailing process was used to collect data. The initial mailing included an explanation of the study, a questionnaire and a stamped, addressed return envelope. With postcard follow-up to non-respondents, a 36% response rate (n=3,660) was attained. A follow-up telephone survey to randomly selected non-respondents revealed no significant differences in their characteristics and responses compared to respondents. Data analysis outcomes revealed a set of essential attributes nurses, regardless of position, clinical setting, or level of involvement in client care (i.e., direct or indirect) must possess in order to provide safe and effective care. Additional attributes essential for safe practice in specific types of clinical settings and care units were also identified. Therefore, this study identified the core functional abilities essential for the performance of nursing activities in a safe and effective manner which can be used determine whether nurses, with or without the use of accommodations, can function safely and effectively in selected employment settings, environments or positions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Functional Abilities Essential for the Provision of Safe, Effective Nursing Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorYocom, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Yocom, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: yocom@nightingale.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163725-
dc.description.abstractTo practice nursing, a licensee must possess a multitude of knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) in order to provide safe and effective nursing care. The KSAs can be dichotomized into two groups: domain specific (i.e., specific to nursing practice) and non-domain specific (i.e., lift, push, see, etc.). With passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, nurse employers, educators and regulators expressed a need for documentation of the attributes essential to perform the full range of duties that a nurse must perform. The purpose of this study was to validate the essential non-domain specific functional abilities a nurse must possess in order to perform nursing activities in a safe, effective manner. The primary research question was: What are the functional abilities a person must possess in order to practice safely? The theoretical framework encompassed the normal range of psychomotor, cognitive and communicative skills, the neurological senses, and emotional capabilities. The target population for this descriptive study was all licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPN/VNs) and registered nurses (RNs) practicing in the United States. A sample of 10,000 nurses was randomly selected from among all licensed nurses listed on data tapes supplied by 28 states to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. Collectively, the sample represented all nurses licensed to practice in urban and rural areas of large and small states in all geographic regions of the U.S. A self-administered questionnaire, developed for use based on pilot work and focus group input, contained 98 representative attributes grouped within 16 functional ability categories. Content validity and internal consistency of the total scale and all sub-scales were supported. Final assignment of attributes to subscales was based on the results of a factor analysis. A multi-phase mailing process was used to collect data. The initial mailing included an explanation of the study, a questionnaire and a stamped, addressed return envelope. With postcard follow-up to non-respondents, a 36% response rate (n=3,660) was attained. A follow-up telephone survey to randomly selected non-respondents revealed no significant differences in their characteristics and responses compared to respondents. Data analysis outcomes revealed a set of essential attributes nurses, regardless of position, clinical setting, or level of involvement in client care (i.e., direct or indirect) must possess in order to provide safe and effective care. Additional attributes essential for safe practice in specific types of clinical settings and care units were also identified. Therefore, this study identified the core functional abilities essential for the performance of nursing activities in a safe and effective manner which can be used determine whether nurses, with or without the use of accommodations, can function safely and effectively in selected employment settings, environments or positions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:44Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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