2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163726
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural Nurses' Attitudes Toward Participation in Continuing Professional Education
Author(s):
Beatty, Rebecca
Author Details:
Rebecca Beatty, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rmb7@psu.edu
Abstract:
In comparison to urban nurses, rural nurses are greatly disadvantaged when seeking continuing professional education (CPE). They face challenges of professional isolation, difficult travel and receive less financial support from employers to participate in CPE. For these reasons, it is important to explore the learning needs of rural nurses, examine the environment in which they practice, understand their attitudes toward lifelong learning and the reasons they participate in CPE in order to maintain competent practice. Surveys were mailed to 620 nurses (20%) of the total population of nurses) living in rural counties of central Pennsylvania that are designated by the Center for Rural Pennsylvania as 75% or more rural. A total of 253 completed surveys were returned yielding a response rate of 41%. For the purpose of this research, only surveys of nurses who were actively practicing ewer used for data analysis. For this reason, 42 surveys were eliminated from the study sample. In the second phase of the study, fourteen rural nurse administrators were interviewed by the researcher to explore their perceptions of nurse employee' attitudes toward CPE and to gain an understanding of the organizational culture in which the rural nurses were working. Survey instruments utilized included the Participation Reasons Scale, the Adult Attitudes toward Continuing Education Scale and the Respondents Information Scale. Statistical analysis yielded a composite picture of RNs in Rural Pennsylvania. The mean age was 46 but they continue to seek out learning experiences while attempting to balance learning needs with life circumstances. Respondents report that they value lifelong learning as a method to insure the delivery of high quality care. However, analysis revealed that there is a statistically significant relationship between the type of basic nursing education and whether or not nurses engage in lifelong learning. Nurses who graduated from hospital diploma programs were less likely to participate than nurses who graduated from a college or university. Furthermore, the more education the nurse had, the more they participated. Nurses pursue lifelong learning as part of their commitment to their patients because they report receiving little external positive reinforcement for their efforts. Respondents reported that having the support of their spouse (partner) or nursing supervisor greatly facilitated participation in CPE. This support outweighed the demands of their other roles and responsibilities. The findings from this study support the need for a positive organizational culture for lifelong learning and the need for schools of nursing to socialize students in their basic programs to continue their education postgraduate.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural Nurses' Attitudes Toward Participation in Continuing Professional Educationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeatty, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsRebecca Beatty, Pennsylvania State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: rmb7@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163726-
dc.description.abstractIn comparison to urban nurses, rural nurses are greatly disadvantaged when seeking continuing professional education (CPE). They face challenges of professional isolation, difficult travel and receive less financial support from employers to participate in CPE. For these reasons, it is important to explore the learning needs of rural nurses, examine the environment in which they practice, understand their attitudes toward lifelong learning and the reasons they participate in CPE in order to maintain competent practice. Surveys were mailed to 620 nurses (20%) of the total population of nurses) living in rural counties of central Pennsylvania that are designated by the Center for Rural Pennsylvania as 75% or more rural. A total of 253 completed surveys were returned yielding a response rate of 41%. For the purpose of this research, only surveys of nurses who were actively practicing ewer used for data analysis. For this reason, 42 surveys were eliminated from the study sample. In the second phase of the study, fourteen rural nurse administrators were interviewed by the researcher to explore their perceptions of nurse employee' attitudes toward CPE and to gain an understanding of the organizational culture in which the rural nurses were working. Survey instruments utilized included the Participation Reasons Scale, the Adult Attitudes toward Continuing Education Scale and the Respondents Information Scale. Statistical analysis yielded a composite picture of RNs in Rural Pennsylvania. The mean age was 46 but they continue to seek out learning experiences while attempting to balance learning needs with life circumstances. Respondents report that they value lifelong learning as a method to insure the delivery of high quality care. However, analysis revealed that there is a statistically significant relationship between the type of basic nursing education and whether or not nurses engage in lifelong learning. Nurses who graduated from hospital diploma programs were less likely to participate than nurses who graduated from a college or university. Furthermore, the more education the nurse had, the more they participated. Nurses pursue lifelong learning as part of their commitment to their patients because they report receiving little external positive reinforcement for their efforts. Respondents reported that having the support of their spouse (partner) or nursing supervisor greatly facilitated participation in CPE. This support outweighed the demands of their other roles and responsibilities. The findings from this study support the need for a positive organizational culture for lifelong learning and the need for schools of nursing to socialize students in their basic programs to continue their education postgraduate.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:45Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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