2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163727
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Urinary Incontinence in Working Women
Author(s):
Palmer, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Palmer, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: palmer@nightingale.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Urinary incontinence (UI) is typically considered a geriatric issue, yet younger women do report UI. Little, however, is known about the prevalence of UI in healthy working women, specifically those employed in a manufacturing environment. This study was undertaken to better understand UI and its impact on working women. Specific Aims: The expected outcomes of this study were threefold; 1) To determine the prevalence of UI symptoms in working women, 2) To identify factors associated with UI in working women and, 3) To identify help-seeking behaviors used by incontinent working women. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Recruitment occurred in a large manufacturing and distribution center in rural PA. A convenience sample of 500 full-time female employees aged 18 years or older was queried. An eight-page questionnaire elicited demographic and health characteristics information, symptoms and duration of urine loss, management strategies and help-seeking behaviors. Analyses were performed with Microsoft Word and SPSS Windows Version 10.0. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained prior to implementation of the study. Results: Results showed a response rate of 53.8%, (N=269) with a mean age of 40 years (SD9.9), range (16-69). Of the sample population, 29% (n=78) were incontinent at least monthly and the majority of the sample population was Caucasian, 88% (n=65). Incontinent women had a significantly higher BMI (29.4 versus 25.6, p< .05) and were significantly older than continent women (44.8 versus 38.1, p< .05). Incontinent women used a variety of strategies to hide urine loss, such as, wearing feminine hygiene pads (47%), using dusting powder (29%), wearing dark clothes to work (20%), and using deodorant spray (18%). Only 29% (n=17) managed UI by performing pelvic muscle exercises. In the past year of reporting, only 23% (n=17) had a urinary tract infection. Most women attributed their urinary leakage to parity (29%) which was significantly related to having UI (<.05) and waiting too long to empty their bladder (37%). The majority of women, 62% (n=48) did not report UI symptoms to a nurse or a doctor. Thirty-seven percent (n=29) had read articles in women's magazines about UI but only 4% (n=3) had asked for more information about UI. Women also related concerns about smelling like urine and having detectable accidents and they reported certain work-related activities such as lifting and bending could not be avoided. Conclusions: Women in a manufacturing center experience UI at a rate consistent with the national average for women. Modifiable factors were identified that could help women control UI, namely BMI, help-seeking behavior and treatment information. Most incontinent women did not engage in active strategies to get more information about incontinence but expressed an interest in learning more and stated that it was an important problem to resolve. Implications: Because UI is prevalent and has an impact on women's lives, it is necessary for nurses to view UI as a Women's Health issue. Nurses must incorporate routine screening procedures for incontinence in women during health care exchanges with working women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
ENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Atlantic City, New Jersey, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUrinary Incontinence in Working Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Palmer, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: palmer@nightingale.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163727-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Urinary incontinence (UI) is typically considered a geriatric issue, yet younger women do report UI. Little, however, is known about the prevalence of UI in healthy working women, specifically those employed in a manufacturing environment. This study was undertaken to better understand UI and its impact on working women. Specific Aims: The expected outcomes of this study were threefold; 1) To determine the prevalence of UI symptoms in working women, 2) To identify factors associated with UI in working women and, 3) To identify help-seeking behaviors used by incontinent working women. Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Recruitment occurred in a large manufacturing and distribution center in rural PA. A convenience sample of 500 full-time female employees aged 18 years or older was queried. An eight-page questionnaire elicited demographic and health characteristics information, symptoms and duration of urine loss, management strategies and help-seeking behaviors. Analyses were performed with Microsoft Word and SPSS Windows Version 10.0. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained prior to implementation of the study. Results: Results showed a response rate of 53.8%, (N=269) with a mean age of 40 years (SD9.9), range (16-69). Of the sample population, 29% (n=78) were incontinent at least monthly and the majority of the sample population was Caucasian, 88% (n=65). Incontinent women had a significantly higher BMI (29.4 versus 25.6, p< .05) and were significantly older than continent women (44.8 versus 38.1, p< .05). Incontinent women used a variety of strategies to hide urine loss, such as, wearing feminine hygiene pads (47%), using dusting powder (29%), wearing dark clothes to work (20%), and using deodorant spray (18%). Only 29% (n=17) managed UI by performing pelvic muscle exercises. In the past year of reporting, only 23% (n=17) had a urinary tract infection. Most women attributed their urinary leakage to parity (29%) which was significantly related to having UI (<.05) and waiting too long to empty their bladder (37%). The majority of women, 62% (n=48) did not report UI symptoms to a nurse or a doctor. Thirty-seven percent (n=29) had read articles in women's magazines about UI but only 4% (n=3) had asked for more information about UI. Women also related concerns about smelling like urine and having detectable accidents and they reported certain work-related activities such as lifting and bending could not be avoided. Conclusions: Women in a manufacturing center experience UI at a rate consistent with the national average for women. Modifiable factors were identified that could help women control UI, namely BMI, help-seeking behavior and treatment information. Most incontinent women did not engage in active strategies to get more information about incontinence but expressed an interest in learning more and stated that it was an important problem to resolve. Implications: Because UI is prevalent and has an impact on women's lives, it is necessary for nurses to view UI as a Women's Health issue. Nurses must incorporate routine screening procedures for incontinence in women during health care exchanges with working women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:12:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:12:46Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.nameENRS 13th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlantic City, New Jersey, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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